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World Catholicism Week 2011

World Catholicism Week 2011

View conference videos here.

The theme for World Catholicism Week 2011 is the unity and diversity of Catholic faith throughout the globe. Chicago is a global city, and the students at DePaul University represent over 100 countries. The three events for this week demonstrate that the vitality of the Church is only strengthened by its diversity.

Catholic cultural diversity is the fruit of a spirituality of communion. The spirituality of communion forges a new sense of community in the light of God’s gift to the Church of a Trinitarian communion. This gift is sustained as truly a gift from God in the celebration of the liturgy but also needs to be just as truly present in the Church’s entire mode of being and its public witness. This spirituality “means, finally, to know how to ‘make room’ for our brothers and sisters, bearing ‘each other's burdens’ (Gal 6:2) and, in the words of Pope John Paul II, resisting the selfish temptations that constantly beset us and provoke competition, careerism, distrust and jealousy.” Pope John Paul II maintained, echoing the wise path of simplicity of St. Vincent de Paul and St. Louise de Marillac, that a spirituality of communion already exists: “it is the plan found in the Gospel and in the living Tradition…it has its centre in Christ himself.” Facing Christ, we realize that mere tolerance is sometimes not enough. A spirituality of communion means listening to one another and recognizing the absolute goodness of the other as gift.

This week aims to celebrate the spirituality of communion, to explore its potential for personal and social transformation, and to recognize, through a purification of memory, where the Catholic Church has fallen far short of its own ideals. As such, the entire week will be dedicated to the courageous figure of Fr. Augustus Tolton (1854-1897). Fr. Tolton was the first publicly recognized African American priest in the United States. Even though he was a freed slave and an ordained priest, Fr. Tolton still had to flee his original diocese in southern Illinois and move to Chicago on account of racism. Throughout World Catholicism Week 2011, we will remember Fr. Tolton’s saintly witness and urban ministry in the city of Chicago.

Monday, April 11, 2011
Catholic Spirituality: A Global Communion

Speaker: Maria Voce, President of Focolare
Respondents:
Thomas Norris, author of The Trinity: Life of God, Hope for Humanity
David Schindler, author of Heart of the World, Center of the Church

Schedule & Session Descriptions

Catholic Spirituality: A Global Communion
Monday, April 11, 2011

The first day of World Catholicism Week is intended primarily for undergraduates. Since its founding in 1907, DePaul University has been blessed with diversity of many sorts. In the Catholic Church, we encounter diversity in many ways—the multiplicity of religious orders, for example, each with a distinct charism and mission. The week begins with a consideration of the wider spiritual, intellectual, and social dimensions of the Catholic global communion. The first part of the day deals with global perspectives on the Catholic intellectual tradition, on peace and reconciliation, and on the Gospel of Life. Afternoon sessions deal with exciting, new approaches to Catholic spirituality found in practices like hospitality and memoir writing, as well as in the voices of distinct members of the Catholic communion such as Latino/a youth, African American saints, and members of the Syro-Malabar rite that has migrated from southern India to Bellwood, Illinois.


The celebration of global spirituality will conclude with a public lecture by Maria Voce, the president of Focolare, a movement of over 100,000 members, mostly Catholic and some non-Catholic. Maria Voce will deliver an address on the vision of unity held by Chiara Lubich, the founder of Focolare. Two very important and internationally recognized Catholic theologians, Fr. Thomas Norris and Dr. David Schindler, will offer their responses to Maria Voce’s lecture.

Schedule

April 11, 2011

Welcome: Peter Casarella, Director, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, and Professor, Catholic Studies, DePaul University

Being a Thinking Catholic: Global Perspectives on Catholic Studies
Panelists: 
Karen Scott, Chair, Catholic Studies, DePaul University
Judith Povilus, Provost, Pontifical Sophia University Institute (Florence, Italy)
Christophe Potworowski, Chair, Catholic Studies, McGill University (Montreal, Canada)

Peacemaking & Catholic Studies
Moderator: Mary Jean Larrabee; Director of Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies Program, DePaul University 
Michael Baxter, Visiting Associate Professional Specialist in Theology, University of Notre Dame

"Before You Were Born, I Knew You:" The Right to Life & the Challenge of Communion
John-Paul Deddens, Founding Director, Students for Life of Illinois

Raised in Jerusalem :Latino Spirituality in the Next Generation
Moderator: Chris Tirres, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies, DePaul University
Speaker: Michael Lee, Assistant Professor, Theology, Fordham University
Dr. Lee, author of the prize-winning book Bearing the Weight of Salvation: The Soteriology of Ignacio Ellacuría, will offer his insights into the challenges faced, both in the Church and in society, by the younger generations of Latino Catholics


Ecology & Interreligious Dialogue: Green Monasticism
Moderator: Scott Kelley, Assistant Vice President for Vincentian Scholarship, Mission & Values, DePaul University
Speaker: Donald Mitchell, Professor, Philosophy, Purdue University
Respondents: Liam Heneghan, Co-director, Institute for Nature & Culture, DePaul University
David Wellman, Co-director, Center for Religious Engagement, DePaul University
This session brings together Donald Mitchell, Liam Heneghan and David Wellman, noted experts on both interreligious dialogue and environmental science, to explore the interface between the spirituality that derives from the contemplative life of monastic centers of learning and the pressing challenge in the world, and at DePaul, to promote environmental sustainability.


Sacred Hospitality
Thomas Maier, Assistant Professor, School of Hospitality Leadership, DePaul University
Rev. Claudio Holzer, C.S., Pastor, Our Lady of Mount Carmel Shrine (Melrose Park, IL)
Marco Tavanti, Associate Professor, School of Public Service, DePaul University
Theory and practice converge in this exciting session about the religious and theological dimensions of practices of hospitality in history and contemporary experience. The session is designed for students in DePaul’s new School of Hospitality Leadership and will examine how different Catholic religious orders and social movements (e.g., Benedict, Jesuit, and Vincentian) have promoted practices of hospitality as a form of discipleship and as a spiritual exercise. This theological reflection will also be directed to the practices of welcoming recent immigrants to Chicago and Melrose Park as well as to global practices of hospitality considered through their spiritual and ethical dimensions.

Evolution in the U.S.A. & Creation in the Catholic Theological Tradition
James Halstead, Chair, Religious Studies, DePaul University 
Scott Paeth, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies, DePaul University 
For decades, the "Theory of Evolution" has been an issue in American public life. Science curricula in public schools, textbook selection, the hiring and firing of teachers, as well as federal funding of some scientific projects and even presidential politics have all been caught up in the creationism controversy. Yet the Catholic intellectual tradition has not contested evolutionary theory.
In this workshop, Professors Scott Paeth and James Halstead will review the American debate around evolution and discuss that debate in relationship to the Catholic theological tradition's reflection on Divine Providence, creation/redemption, and theological anthropology.​


Kerala Catholicism & the Global Communion
Moderator: Benita Antony, Catholic Studies, DePaul University
Speakers: Jaisy Joseph, Harvard Divinity School
Abin Kuriakose, School of Commerce, DePaul University, & St. Thomas
Syro-Malabar Catholic Diocese of Chicago 
St. Thomas the Apostle traveled in 52 A.D. to the Kerala Province of southern India and planted a seed for future global growth. Today, the followers of this earliest of Christian missions number 3.8 million worldwide. They exist as a Church with its own East Syrian rite that stands in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church. As such, they have their own hierarchical and synodal structure and are a good of example of how Catholicism embodies the notion of being “ a Church of churches.” This discussion of the dynamic experience of Kerala Catholicism today will be undertaken by three Kerala youth who will share their experiences of participation in this global communion. Benita Antony will moderate the discussion. Jaisy Joseph will share the research she has undertaken at Harvard Divinity School, and Abin Kuriakose of the St. Thomas Syro-Malabar Catholic Diocese of Chicago will describe his leadership role during the summer of 2010 as a youth participant in the global synod in Kerala.

Memory, Memoir, & Meaning: Telling Our Sacred Stories 
Farrell O'Gorman, Associate Professor, Catholic Studies, DePaul University
Scott Kelley, Assistant Vice President for Vincentian Scholarship, Mission & Values, DePaul University
Siobhan O'Donoghue, Associate Director for Community Service, DePaul University
After a brief overview of the genre, meanings, and purposes of writing spiritual memoir, the three panelists in this session will engage participants in a discussion-based exploration of the what, why, and how of writing spiritual memoir. The session is intended to be exploratory and dialogical, so participants are encouraged to come prepared to discuss, brainstorm, and come away with some concrete ideas about how to begin writing their own spiritual memoir.

Our Lady of the World: Mary in the Global Communion of the Church
Moderator: Shelby Mongan, Catholic Studies, DePaul University
Speakers: Paul O'Hara, Chair, Mathematics, Northeastern Illinois University
Rev. Esequiel Sanchez, Pastor, Mary Queen of Heaven Catholic Church (Cicero, IL)
This session focuses on the role of the Virgin Mary within the global Catholic communion. Dr. O’Hara, a theologian and scientist, will present recent research he completed at The Catholic Theological Union in Chicago on the Marian profile of the Church. Fr. Sanchez will discuss the devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe among Mexican American Catholics in Chicago and how this practice of faith creates a spiritual bridge between Catholic communities here and in Mexico.

The Road to Canonization: The Spirituality & Life of Fr. Augustus Tolton
Moderator: Mark Laboe, Associate Vice President, University
Ministry/Student Affairs; DePaul University
Speaker: C. Vanessa White, Director, Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry Program, Catholic Theological Union 
Racism breaks down communion and makes it impossible to speak credibly about unity, either inside or outside of the Catholic communion. Fr. Augustus Tolton (1854-1897) endured racism by both Catholics and non-Catholics, created pastoral and advocacy structures to support Black Catholics, and lived a holy Christian life. For this reason, he is on the road to canonization. His cause was recently accepted by the Vatican, and Bishop Joseph Perry of the Archdiocese of Chicago has established a historical commission to aid in the preparation of the cause. Dr. C. Vanessa White, a leading Black Catholic theologian and head of the Augustus Tolton Scholarship Program at The Catholic Theological Union, will lead a discussion of Fr. Tolton’s life and courageous witness.

Spirituality & Trinitarian Theology in the Life & Thought of Chiara Lubich
Moderator: Peter Casarella, Director, Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology, DePaul University
Speaker: Maria Voce, President, The Focolare Movement
Respondents: Thomas Norris, Member, International Theological Commission, & Professor Emeritus, St. Patrick's College, Maynooth (Maynooth, Ireland)
David Schindler, Provost/Dean & Gagnon Professor of Fundamental Theology, Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage & Family, The Catholic University of America

​​

Tuesday & Wednesday, April 12-13, 2011
The Discourse of Catholicity

Speakers:
John Allen, author of The Future Church
Michael Budde, author of The Borders of Baptism: Identities, Allegiances, and the Church
Peter Casarella, Director, Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology, DePaul University
Walter Euler, Professor, Fundamental Theology & Ecumenical Theology, University of Trier (Germany)
Emmanuel Katongole, author of The Sacrifice of Africa
Anselm Min, author of Solidarity of Others in a Divided World
Margarita Mooney, author of Faith Makes Us Live: Surviving & Thriving in the Haitian Diaspora
Robert Schreiter, author of The New Catholicity and Constructing Local Theologies

Schedule & Session Descriptions

The Discourse of Catholicity
Tuesday & Wednesday, April 12-13, 2011

“Catholicity” is the unity in diversity of the Church expressed in a global communion of faith. The term goes to the core of how the Church understands itself and how it can witness to greater unity in the world. The shift from a predominantly Euroamerican focus to a Church that attends equally to the global South creates great challenges in—and tremendous promise for—articulating a new theology of communion.

The call to dialogue, greater inclusion, and the promotion of local and contextual theologies have rightly advanced a new understanding of the Catholic Church's nature and mission. Facing the new challenges is equally stimulated by looking at the sources for the discourse of catholicity in Scripture and through diverse engagements with the theological tradition. This conference looks at catholicity both in terms of reading the new signs of the times and in terms of seeking renewal by a return to the sources.

The rethinking of the discourse of catholicity does not, however, end with futurology, historical retrieval, or a simple juxtaposition of two vantage points. Practices of catholicity need to be reconsidered in terms of a fresh, new theological appraisal of our situation today. This new approach includes looking at spiritual, liturgical, social, and political practices that acknowledge division and fragmentation and promote reconciliation and the living out of a real unity in diversity.

This conference is the fruit of a process extending back to the founding, in 2008, of the Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology. CWCIT organized conferences in 2008 and 2010 that looked at the global future of Catholicism in new ways.

In particular, CWCIT sponsored an international colloquium, “Forms of Catholicity,” in January 2009. We were able to bring together key international Catholic scholars who have helped to forge “the discourse of catholicity” as a theological idiom. The point of departure was an address originally delivered in Manila by Prof. Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S., of The Catholic Theological Union. In his talk, Schreiter argued cogently for a discussion that would address the gap between Concilium and Communio, i.e., between—to cite his words more precisely—the strand in Catholic thought that he links to Gaudium et Spes and the strand that he labels “neo-Augustinian.” This gathering included a presentation by Schreiter, a paper by Jorge Scampini, O.P. on catholicity and ecumenism, and a paper by Miriam Wyjlens on catholicity and canon law.

In this year's conference, CWCIT has gathered scholars who are forging a discourse of catholicity that will serve the Church of the 21st century.

Schedule

April 12, 2011

Opening Plenary Session
Moderator: Peter Casarella, Director, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, DePaul University
Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S., Vatican Council II Professor of Theology, Catholic Theological Union
Emmanuel Katongole, Co-director, Center for Reconciliation, Duke University

Catholicity & the Mission of the Holy Spirit in the Light of the Global Expansion of Pentecostalism & the Charismatic Renewal 
Moderator: Bill Cavanaugh, Senior Research Fellow, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, and Professor, Catholic Studies, DePaul University
Speakers: Jeffrey Gros, FSC, Distinguished Professor of Ecumenical & Historical Theology, Memphis Theological Seminary 
Ralph Del Colle, Associate Professor, Theology, Marquette University
The publication in 2006 of the fruits of an International Roman Catholic-Pentecostal Dialoguecreated great promise for ecumenical understanding and Catholic renewal. At the same time, the challenge remains to look at catholicity and the mission of the Holy Spirit in the light of the global expansion of Pentecostalism and the Charismatic renewal. Ralph Del Colle is an expert on the theology of the Holy Spirit and a member of the Catholic-Pentecostal International Dialogue. Br. Jeffrey Gros, F.S.C., is a leading scholar on the ecumenical question in Latin America. Both will address the current challenges in a global perspective.

Charles Taylor and the Hermeneutics of Intercultural Dialogue
Moderator: Elizabeth Millán, Philosophy, DePaul University
Speakers: William Barbieri, Associate Professor, School of Theology & Religious Studies, The Catholic University of America
Carolyn Chau,Toronto School of Theology, Regis College (Toronto, Canada)
Pablo Lazo Briones, Professor & Researcher, Philosophy, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico City, Mexico)
Even before the appearance of The Secular Age (2007), Charles Taylor had already developed an ethics of intercultural dialogue. In fact, he had highlighted the potential of a philosophical theory of interpretation for intercultural dialogue. Taylor also dealt with the view that to understand the world through a philosophical theory of interpretation did not entail turning a blind eye to justice or social fragmentation. His work also deals with the need in our age to embrace multiple theories of modernity and modernization. In this panel, experts on Taylor’s intercultural thought from Mexico, the United States, and Canada will discuss his contribution to a theory and theology of intercultural dialogue. The presentation by Prof. Lazo Briones will be delivered in Spanish, but an English translation will be provided to all the participants.

Unity & Diversity in the Heritage of Catholic Social Teaching: A Celebration of the 120th Anniversary of Rerum Novarum
Moderator: Patrick Callahan, Professor, Political Science, DePaul University
Speakers: Zachary Calo,Assistant Professor of Law, Valparaiso University
Thomas O'Brien, Associate Professor, Religious Studies, DePaul University

This year marks a milestone in the history of Catholic social thought. To celebrate that event and to think about the relationship between social concerns and theological issues that are simultaneously global and local, this session will explore two timely approaches to the history of Catholic social thought. Thomas O’Brien will examine Quadragesimo anno (1931) in the light of our own present-day context that features divisive partisanship and market collapse. He argues that the papal document from World War II offers contemporary readers a different lens through which to view our own delicate and turbulent times. Zachary Calo, a historian who works on the interface between law and theology, will present his own contextual, historical, and theological research on the thought of John K. Ryan, a critical figure in the development of Catholic social thought in the 20th century United States.

Civil Religions, National Myths, and the Catholicity of the Church: Toward a Comparative Exploration

Moderator: Michael Budde, Senior Research Fellow, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, DePaul University
Speakers: Martin Menke, Professor, History & Government, Rivier College
Slavica Jakelic, Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, University of Virginia
This session explores the complex and sometimes controversial interaction of Catholicism and political nationalism. It seeks to provide a comparative context for thinking about national myth-making, political/cultural identity formation, and ecclesial thought and practice. Contributors will offer reflections on contemporary case studies, including German Catholicism in the Nazi era and 20th century East European religious nationalism.

New Paradigms for Global Ecclesiology 
Moderator: Charles Strain, Professor, Religious Studies, DePaul University
Speakers: Linh Hoang, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies, Siena College
Teresia Hinga, Associate Professor, Religious Studies, Santa Clara University
At the beginning of the 20th century, only 25 percent of the world’s Catholic population lived outside Europe and North America. By the end of the 20th century, 65.5% of the Catholic population was found in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. A leading expert onthe Asian American Catholic experience and a groundbreaking scholar of women’s movements in Africa will lead this discussion of some of the new developments in ecclesiology that arise from the deeper consideration of what Karl Rahner called “a world Church."

Second Plenary Session
Moderator: Michael Budde, Senior Research Fellow, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, DePaul University
Walter Euler, Professor, Fundamental Theology & Ecumenical Theology, Faculty of Theology, University of Trier (Trier, Germany)
Peter Casarella, Director, Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology, DePaul University

April 13, 2011

Third Plenary Session
Moderator: Bill Cavanaugh, Senior Research Professor, Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology, & Professor, Catholic Studies, DePaul University
Speakers: Michael Budde, Senior Research Fellow, Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology, DePaul University
Margarita Mooney, Assistant Professor, Sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Unity & Diversity of the Church in the New Testament 
Moderator:Karen Scott, Chair, Catholic Studies, DePaul University
Speakers: Margaret Mitchell, Professor, New Testament & Early Christian Literature, & Dean, Divinity School, University of Chicago
Barbara Reid, O.P., Professor, New Testament, & Vice President/Academic Dean, Catholic Theological Union
Two internationally recognized experts on the New Testament consider the question of how the earliest Christian community dealt with particularity, fragmentation, conflict, and diversity while indwelling the one body of Christ. Dean Margaret Mitchell, an expert on Paul and the origins of early Christian hermeneutics, will concentrate on the theme of unity and diversity of the Church in 1 Corinthians. Dean Barbara Reid, O.P., will draw upon her expertise in interpreting the New Testament through Latina and feminist eyes to shed light on the question.

Catholicity in the Fathers of the Church
Moderator:Stuart Squires, Instructor, Religious Studies, DePaul University
Speakers: Rev. Dr. J. Kiran Sebastian, H. George Anderson Professor of Mission & Cultures, Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
Chad Pecknold, Assistant Professor, Historical & Systematic Theology, The Catholic University of America
Michael Hollerich, Professor, Theology, University of St. Thomas
"Then every scribe who has been instructed in the kingdom of heaven is like the head of a household who brings from his storeroom both the new and the old" (Mark 13:52). Our dialogue about the “Discourse of Catholicity” treats new catholicity in the light of an ample tradition of Christian thought and the traditional “mark” of the Church in the light of recent global developments. This panel brings into dialogue a scholar of Eusebius of Caesarea and the political theology of the early Church; the author of a recent general history of the relationship between politics and Christianity who has scrutinized with particular care the diverse recent attempts at retrieving the political doctrine of Augustine’s City of God; and an ecumenical expert on the idea of the unity of the Church in Cyprian of Carthage who has also reflected extensively on postcolonial theology and the mission of the Church today.

The Mutual Exchange of Gifts: Clergy Formation & the Challenge of Intercultural Dialogue
Keynote Speaker & Moderator: Msgr. Wayne Prist, Director of Priest Development, Archdiocese of Chicago 
Panelists: Daniel Borlik, C.M., DePaul University Board of Trustees 
Louis Cameli, S.T.D., Archdiocese of Chicago, Archbishop’s Delegate for Formation & Mission
Joseph R. Ferrari, Professor, Psychology, DePaul University 
Daniel Gast, Director, Project INSPIRE
Kevin Gillespie, S.J., Associate Provost, Loyola University of Chicago 
Manuel Ginete, C.M., preparing to serve in Sudan 
Lennoxie Lusabe, C.M., served in Kenya, currently graduate student in Canada
Patrick McDevitt, C.M., Assistant Professor, School of Education, DePaul University
Gary A. Mueller, C.M., served in Kenya, currently graduate student in Rome
The session will address the ongoing formational needs of Roman Catholic priests in today’s multicultural and global society. The church in the United States is rapidly seeing a demographic change in the ethnic, racial, and national composition of the presbyterate. Given these changes, there are opportunities for greater collaboration, intercultural sharing, and mutual learning and support among national groups. The interfacing of cultures is a new venue for ongoing priestly formation, education, and transformation. (Lunch provided.)

Book Presentation: A World for All? Global Civil Society in Political Theory & Trinitarian Theology 
Presenters: Rev. Dr. J. Kiran Sebastian, H. George Anderson Professor of Mission & Cultures, Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
Peter Casarella, Director, Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology, DePaul University 
Paul Louis Metzger, Director, Institute for the Theology of Culture, Multnomah Biblical Seminary
Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S., Vatican Council II Professor of Theology, Catholic Theological Union 
William Storrar, Director, Center for Theological Inquiry 
This volume's three editors and one of the contributors will offer their remarks on the forthcoming publication. Regarding this publication, Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S., who will also participate in this session, writes: 
"This volume advances significantly an important discussion of the meaning of global civil society and how Christian theology might engage it. Its interdisciplinary character assures that it will reach sectors in political science, philosophy, and theology. The range of voices represented here reflect the complexity and the urgency of the question of how we are to continue on a worldwide exchange of action and policy that will allow the world to live together in a genuinely humane fashion. No discussion of political theology, social theory, and cosmopolitanism can be continued without reference to this book."​

Fourth Plenary Session
Moderator: Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S., Vatican Council II Professor of Theology, Catholic Theological Union 
Anselm Min, Dean & Maguire Distinguished Professor of Religion, School of Religion, Claremont Graduate University

Closing Plenary
Moderator: Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S., Vatican Council II Professor of Theology, Catholic Theological Union 
John Allen Senior Correspondent, National Catholic Reporter, & Senior Vatican Analyst, CNN

Closing Remarks
Peter Casarella, Director, Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology, DePaul University

​​

Thursday, April 13, 2011
Urban Studies in the Mirror of World Catholicism

Speaker:
Graham Ward, author of Cities of God

Schedule & Session Descriptions

Urban Studies in the Mirror of World Catholicism
Thursday, April 14

This seminar on Urban Studies and Global Catholicism is intended for faculty but is open to the general public.

DePaul brands itself as a university that is Catholic, Vincentian, and urban. Since its founding, there has been a close connection between the Catholic mission and the commitment to serving the underrepresented in its own urban setting. In this session, we will examine the theological origins of the very notion of the city and, with the help of noted theologian Graham Ward, begin to explore how the self-understanding of the Christian community is intimately related to the body politic by way of the concrete practices of urban life like working at minimum-level wages, shopping to satisfy a consumerist desire, dwelling in high-rise apartments, and being homeless.

The panel discussion following Ward’s lecture will include experts on different aspects of the interface between urban studies and the theology of the city.

Each year, the Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology sponsors a faculty seminar as part of World Catholicism Week. Last year, journalist John Allen gave a presentation on Pope Benedict XVI's environmental theology in order to stimulate a conversation by DePaul faculty on the religious dimensions of environmental sustainability. Graham Ward's presentation follows in this tradition and is being named the First Annual Peter V. Byrne, C.M., Lecture. The controversial and visionary first president of DePaul University, Byrne forged ahead in 1907 with the bold desire to build a Catholic university and liberal arts curriculum for all the urban immigrants of the city of Chicago and in which there would be no religious test for admission to the college or to the faculty.

Schedule

April 14, 2011

First Annual Fr. Peter V. Byrne, C.M., Lecture
Graham Ward Samuel Fergusson Professor of Philosophical Theology & Ethics University of Manchester (Manchester, England)
Moderator: Bill Cavanaugh, Senior Research Professor, Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology, & Professor, Catholic Studies, DePaul University

Panel Discussion
Margarita Mooney, Assistant Professor, Sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
Sarah Bond, Adjunct Professor, Catholic Studies & History of Art, DePaul University
Larry Bennett, Professor, Political Science, DePaul University
Charles Suchar, Dean, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, DePaul University​


Speakers

John L. Allen Jr.
Senior Correspondent, National Catholic Reporter
Senior Vatican Analyst, CNN

William A. Barbieri Jr.
Associate Professor, School of Theology and Religious Studies
Director, Religion and Culture Program
Fellow, Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies
The Catholic University of America

Michael Baxter
Visiting Associate Professional Specialist in Theology
University of Notre Dame

Larry Bennett
Professor, Political Science
DePaul University

Sarah Carrig Bond
Adjunct Professor, Catholic Studies
Adjunct Professor, History of Art and Architecture
DePaul University

Michael Budde
Senior Research Fellow, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology
DePaul University

Zachary Calo
Associate Professor, Law
Valparaiso University School of Law

Peter Casarella
Conference Organizer
Professor, Catholic Studies Program
Director, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology
DePaul University

William Cavanaugh
Professor, Catholic Studies
Senior Research Fellow, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology
DePaul University

Carolyn Chau
Toronto School of Theology
Regis College (Canada)

John-Paul Deddens
Executive Director
Students for Life of Illinois

Ralph Del Colle
Associate Professor, Theology
Marquette University

Walter Andreas Euler
Professor, Fundamental Theology and Ecumenical Theology
Lecturer, Religious Sciences and Cusanus Research
Director, Institute of Cusanus Research
Faculty of Theology, University of Trier (Germany)

Bro. Jeffrey Gros, FSC
President, Society for Pentecostal Studies
Dean, Catholic Institute for Ecumenical Leadership
Distinguished Professor of Ecumenical and Historical Theology
Memphis Theological Seminary

Rev James R. Halstead, OSA
Chair and Associate Professor, Religious Studies
DePaul University

Liam Heneghan
Professor, Environmental Science
Co-director, Institute for Nature and Culture
DePaul University

Teresia Hinga
Associate Professor, Religious Studies
Santa Clara University

Linh Hoang
Assistant Professor, Religious Studies
Siena College

Michael Hollerich
Professor, Theology
University of St. Thomas

Rev. Claudio Holzer, CS
Pastor
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Shrine (Melrose Park, IL)

Slavica Jakelić
Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture
University of Virginia

Jaisy Joseph
Harvard Divinity School

Emmanuel Katongole
Co-director, Center for Reconciliation
Divinity School
Duke University

Scott Kelley
Assistant Vice President for Vincentian Scholarship
Office of Mission and Values
DePaul University

Abin Kuriakose
College of Commerce
DePaul University
Pastoral Council
St. Thomas Syro-Malabar Catholic Diocese of Chicago

Michael E. Lee
Associate Professor, Systematic Theology
Fordham University

Pablo Lazo Briones
Professor and Researcher, Department of Philosophy
Coordinator, Postgraduate Studies in Philosophy
Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico City)

Thomas Maier
Assistant Professor, School of Hospitality Leadership
DePaul University

Martin Menke
Professor, History and Government
Rivier College

Paul Louis Metzger
Professor, Christian Theology and Theology of Culture
Director, Institute for the Theology of Culture: New Wine, New Wineskins
Multnomah Biblical Seminary

Anselm K. Min
Dean and Maguire Distinguished Professor of Religion
School of Religion, Claremont Graduate University

Donald W. Mitchell
Professor, Comparative Philosophy
Purdue University

Margaret M. Mitchell
Dean, Divinity School
Professor, New Testament and Early Christian Literature
University of Chicago

Margarita A. Mooney
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Rev. Thomas Norris
Professor Emeritus, Systematic Theology
Member, International Theological Commission
St. Patrick's College, Maynooth (Ireland)

Thomas O'Brien
Associate Professor, Religious Studies
DePaul University

Siobhan O'Donoghue
Associate Director for Community Service
DePaul University

Farrell O'Gorman
Associate Professor, Catholic Studies and Literature
DePaul University

Paul O'Hara
Chair, Mathematics
Northeastern Illinois University

Scott Paeth
Associate Professor, Religious Studies
DePaul University

C.C. Pecknold
Assistant Professor, Historical and Systematic Theology
The Catholic University of America

Christophe Potworowski
Kennedy Smith Chair, Catholic Studies
McGill University (Montreal, Canada)

Judith Povilus
Provost
Pontifical Sophia University Institute (Florence, Italy)

Barbara E. Reid, O.P.
Professor, New Testament
Vice President and Academic Dean
Catholic Theological Union

Rev. Esequiel Sanchez
Pastor
Mary Queen of Heaven Catholic Church (Cicero, IL)

David L. Schindler
Provost/Dean and Edouard Cardinal Gagnon Professor of Fundamental Theology
Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family
The Catholic University of America

Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S.
Vatican Council II Professor of Theology
Catholic Theological Union

Karen Scott
Chair, Catholic Studies
DePaul University

Rev. Dr. J. Jayakiran Sebastian
H. George Anderson Professor of Mission and Cultures
Director, Multicultural Mission Resource Center
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

William Storrar
Director
Center for Theological Inquiry

Charles S. Suchar
Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
DePaul University

Marco Tavanti
Associate Professor, Graduate School of Public Service
DePaul University

Maria Voce
President
The Focolare Movement

Graham Ward
Samuel Fergusson Professor of Philosophical Theology and Ethics
Head of the School of Arts, Histories, and Cultures
University of Manchester (England)

David Wellman
Associate Professor, Religios Studies
Co-director, Center for Interreligious Engagement
DePaul University

C. Vanessa White
Assistant Professor, Spirituality
Director, Augustus Tolton Pastoral Ministry Program
Catholic Theological Union