DePaul University College of LAS > Centers & Institutes > DePaul Humanities Center > Events > The Humanimal

The Humanimal

Bear

With:
Jill Greenberg, acclaimed photographic artist, author of Bear Portraits
Jason Wirth, Seattle University, Professor of Philosophy and Film Studies

Monday, May 5, 2014
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 
Cortelyou Commons
2324 North Fremont St.
Lincoln Park Campus
DePaul University 
Chicago

Flyer Details

The Humanities Center inaugurates its spring series with an interdisciplinary, multimedia, inter-multi-species investigation of all things bear, tracing the ways in which bearsand images of bearsshed light on what it is to be more-than-human.
  
Do we guarantee a bear-filled night like youve never seen before? Does a bear live, and possibly do other things, in the woods?

Neither Wholly Animal Nor Holy Man: Post-Human, Post-Animal, Post-Ethics

With:
Nicole Anderson, Department of Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Visiting Fellow, DePaul Humanities Center

Monday, May 19, 2014
6-8 p.m. 
DePaul Student Center - Room 314
2250 N. Sheffield Avenue
Lincoln Park Campus
DePaul University
Chicago

Flyer Details

Inspired by questions of human - animal boundaries and boundary - crossings, the DePaul Humanities Center invites you to an evening of inquiry into the normative implications of thinking through what it means to be with animals when it is not even clear what constitutes animality andhumanity. Beginning with an interactive "petting zoo," in which the audience is encouraged to explore a menagerie located just off the metaphorical coast of the island of Dr. Moreau, we next turn to Prof. Gerard Kuperus, who will graft together Darwin and Nietzsche in an attempt to discover how the "humanimal" marks the possible end of human ethics, and then conclude with Prof. Nicole Anderson as she investigates the senses in which certain animals can or cannot be urbanized, cultured, and technologized. What does the post - humanimal mean for our political and ethical relationships in a hybrid community? Walk, crawl, hop, swing, slither, swim, or fly to the DePaul Student Center and add your voice to the converation.

Co-sponsored with the DePaul Department of Philosophy.

Like Cats and Dogs: The Rhetoric of Film

With: 
Akira Mizuta Lippit
Professor of Cinematic Arts, Critical Studies, Comparative Literature, and East Asian Languages and Cultures
University of Southern California

Wednesday, June 4, 2014
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 
DePaul Student Center - Room 120 
2250 North Sheffield Avenue
Lincoln Park Campus
DePaul University 
Chicago

How can we portray history? How can it render photographically that which defies representation, that which eludes visibility? Arent reality and representation, like cats and dogs, immiscible?  Professor Lippits lecture addresses three that depict three catastrophesthe American Civil War, National Socialism, and the atomic bombing of Hiroshimaonly to find that at key moments, The Birth of a Nation, Triumph of the Will, and Hiroshima mon amour also feature a cat, a rhetorical figure perhaps, a metaphor for the cinematic relation between historical representation and catastrophe.  Why a cat?  Join us as we close our spring series with an exploration of the relationships among film and felines, catastrophes and cats.