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World Catholicism Week 2010

World Catholicism Week 2010

April 20, 2010—This is Our Faith: The Global Diversity of Catholic Youth

This first day was designed for undergraduates and highlights the diverse experiences of Catholic faith across the globe. It opened with Francisco O'Conaire, OFM, Executive Secretary of the Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation Commission, an advocacy center in Rome that serves the leadership of both women and men's religious institutes in the Catholic Church. The afternoon session was a conversation about the global dimensions of Catholicism with DePaul Professor Michael Budde and Rev. Allan Figueroa Deck, SJ, Executive Director of the Secretariat of Cultural Diversity at the US Conference of Catholic Bishops. The day ended with a liturgy and "Feast of Faith" at the St. Vincent de Paul Parish. This event was co-sponsored by University Ministry, Mission and Values, and Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies.

Schedule & Session Descriptions

This is Our Faith: The Global Diversity of Catholic Youth 

April 20, 2010

Youth around the globe are grappling ever more vigorously with their religious identity, and both religious leaders and scholars in the academy have explored the commonalities and differences in these struggles across religions and across cultures. The question of Catholic identity is being raised today and not only in the context of university life in the United States. What are the different paths that young people take to exploring their faith and its meaning in the midst of secularism, indifference, and a host of other questions raised by and about and as a challenge to the Catholic faith? By examining the issue of Catholicism from an intercultural perspective, this gathering invites DePaul students and others to celebrate the unity in diversity emerging locally and globally within and around the dynamic reality of the Catholic Church today. One highlight of the day will be the presentations and involvement of DePaul undergraduates and students from other colleges and universities.

Purpose

"This is Our Faith" is an initiative of DePaul's Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, which is being undertaken in collaboration with the Department of Catholic Studies, University Ministry, Catholic Campus Ministry, and the new major in Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies. The aim is to provide a forum so that DePaul students can reflect concretely upon their experiences of Catholicism in the light of the new global dynamic of the Church. One particular focus of these conversations will be the changing identity of Vincentian Catholicism throughout DePaul’s history and at other similar institutions like St. John’s University, Niagara University, and the International Confederation of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.

This latter theme comes as Worldwide Vincentian Family celebrates in 2010 the 350th anniversary of the deaths of St. Vincent and St. Louise de Marillac.

"This is our Faith" culminated with a Catholic liturgy in the Vincent de Paul Church  by Fr. Christopher Robinson, CM, pastor of the St. Vincent de Paul parish and director of DePaul’s Catholic Campus Ministry. 


Schedule

April 20, 2010

Opening Prayer:  Guillermo Campuzano, CM (University Ministry, DePaul University)
Welcome: Peter Casarella (CWCIT, DePaul University)
 
What can Catholic Youth Learn from the Global Experiences of Religious Working on Peace,Justice, and the Integrity of Creation?
Francisco Gearóid Ó Conaire, OFM (Executive Secretary–Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation Commission of the Union of Major Superiors and the International Union of Major Superiors)
 
Women and Catholicism
Panelists: Gemma Cruz (CWCIT, DePaul University) & Maria Clara Luchetti Bingemer (Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
Moderator: Karen Scott, DePaul
 
The Spiritual Development of Students: To What End?
Panelists: Mark Laboe (Associate Vice President, University Ministry) & Siobhan O'Donoghue (Associate Director of Community Service, University Ministry)
Moderator: Scott Kelley (Assistant Vice President for Vincentian Scholarship, Office of Mission a&nd Values)
 
Luncheon Conversations

Vincentian Youth: Social Awareness & the Vincentian Mission through the Eyes & Actions of Young Adults
Panelists: Anthony Alfano; Jennah Dunham; Samuel Ryan; Sr. Marybeth Kubera, D.C.
Moderator: Georgianna E. Torres Reyes (Assistant Vice President, University Mission & Values, DePaul University)


Vincentian young adults shared testimonies in their work and appeal in the marginalized communities they serve, exploring the relationship between the Vincentian mission and the reality of the 21st century.
As Vincent and Louise recognized the struggles of their time, the presenters were also aware of the oppressive structures and institutions in their communities, therefore finding it necessary to identify & act on the pulse of social consciousness.

This gathering was organized by Vincentian Youth for Vincentian Youth. Made up of members from various organizations that share the Vincentian charism, the convocation was a unique opportunity to develop the vision, capacity and skills necessary for lay leadership.

Nature, Soil, and God
Speakers: James Montgomery & Sr. Damien Marie Savino
Moderator: Francisco Gearóid Ó Conaire, OFM (Executive Secretary, Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation Commission of the Union of Major Superiors and the International Union of Major Superiors)

This conversation focused on dirt, one of the most pervasive & essential elements in human flourishing. Few good meals, for example, can be prepared without fruits of the soil. This session looked at dirt in a multidisciplinary way in order to elicit patterns of thought or points of contact between disciplines that could be useful for future conversations. 

Intentional Community as a Path to Personal & Social Transformation
Panelists: DePaul students from the Vincent & Louise House
Moderator: Denise Prociuk

The Vincent & Louise House is an intentional Catholic community of undergraduate DePaul students committed to community service, social justice and simple living. During this session, current residents shared the realities of their joys & struggles, along with their journey of transformation, and long-term commitment to peace & justice through this one-year residential experience on DePaul's Lincoln Park campus. 

The Catholic Church & Democracy—Global Perspectives: A Workshop Sponsored by Students for Peace & International Development at DePaul​
Moderator: Margaret Grzych (President, Students for Peace & International Development)
Speakers:
Zygmunt Matynia (Consul General of Poland)
Gonzalo Andrade Rivera (Consul General  of Ecuador)
Rev. Michael Osuch, CR (St. Hyacinth’s Parish, Chicago)
Carlos Salmeron (Archdiocese of Chicago )

Karol Wojtyla/Pope John Paul II opened up a new possibility for his native Poland as well as for the world when he traveled to Warsaw in 1979 and witnessed in word and gesture to the inviolable freedom of the human person. This session examined the impact of Wojtyla’s legacy on the Solidarity movement and the Polish people in the early 1980’s and sought to develop connections to a broader vision of global solidarity and democratic freedom. Many people living in Chicago today witnessed the history of the 1980s at close range, but the broader implications for the world today are often not clear. Of particular interest was the connection between the events in Poland in the 1980s, the overall social witness of Pope John Paul II, and the global struggle for democratic freedom in other parts of the world, for example, contemporary Latin America.​

Global Catholicism: Its Challenges & Opportunities for Young People
Panelists: Michael Budde (Department of Catholic Studies and CWCIT, DePaul University) and Allan Figueroa Deck, SJ (Executive Director, Secretariat of Cultural Diversity, USCCB)



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April 21-22, 2010, Wednesday and Thursday- Tradition and Liberation: Charity in Truth and the New Face of Social Progress

The next two days are dedicated to the recent papal encyclical on economic globalization. The opening keynote will feature Archbishop Celestino Migliore, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations and an advocate for "new thinking" at the recent climate change conference in Copenhagen. This academic conference will feature internationally recognized theologians, economists, and business entrepreneurs. Concurrent sessions will address themes such as "The Economy of Communion," "DePaul's Microfinancing Project in Haiti," "Gratuitousness in Economic Theory and Political Economy," "Catholicism, the Nation-State, and Global Governance," and "Women, the Family, and Economic Justice." The closing address will be delivered by Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson, President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, who spoke in an interview about the need for the DePaul conference.

Schedule & Session Descriptions

Tradition and Liberation: Charity in Truth and the New Face of Social Progress 
April 21-22, 2010

Pope Benedict XVI's long-awaited economic encyclical "Charity in Truth" (Caritas in Veritate) has been greeted around the world with both critical acclaim and outright puzzlement. Its message is a critique of economic globalization that at first glance sounds much like progressive thought, allowing The Chicago Tribune to publish a side-by-side comparison of "Obamanomics" and "Popeanomics." On the other hand, the German Pope's undiminished enthusiasm for the renewal of evangelization, the end of abortion, and the necessary promotion of ethical entrepreneurialism receive equal attention in the text. Liberals and conservatives will be able to pick out their choice topics, but both groups will also be challenged by the shift of focus to fundamentals in both theology and economic theory. Catholics and others interested in the new face of social progress touted by Pope Benedict must learn to read the encyclical as whole. This lesson also applies more broadly, as the encyclical itself reminds us, to the unity of personal and social development in the Catholic tradition. "In Christ," writes Pope Benedict, "charity in truth becomes the Face of His Person." Through this gathering DePaul University hopes to bring to light and encourage critical reflection upon this groundbreaking and intrinsically Vincentian dimension of the Church’s most recent encyclical.

Purpose

"Between evangelization and human advancement — development and liberation — there are in fact profound links." On the basis of this insight, Paul VI clearly presented the relationship between the proclamation of Christ and the advancement of the individual in society (Caritas in Veritate, #15).

In the encyclical the Pope raises intriguing issues about the continuity of recent Catholic social teaching as well as its future direction. Neo-conservative voices in the United States have attempted to undermine the German Pope's affirmation of Paul VI's Populorum Progressio (1968). The quotation cited above, however, makes its clear that Benedict is heir to the social teaching of both Paul VI and John Paul II. This is not just a point for discussion by academic theologians but a program for renewing the vocation of the Catholic laity to promote the social message of the Church as a total commitment of faith.

To promote these goals DePaul University is organizing a two-day academic conference on the theme: "Tradition and Liberation: Caritas in Veritate" Of all the words in the title, the most important is "and." Coming in the wake of "Transformed by Hope: Building a Catholic Social Theology for the Americas," this conference will show that Catholicism overcomes bifurcations not just between liberalism and conservatism but between intellectual inquiry and social commitment, between the social gospel of North America and the cry for liberation of the South, and between confronting the person of Jesus Christ and calling for global assessment of economic structures. The conference will encourage a dialogue of these themes in the light of the new encyclical and help to set a future agenda the DePaul Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology. 

Schedule

April 21, 2010

Welcome: Rev. Dennis H. Holtschneider, C.M., President, DePaul University
Opening Remarks: Charles Suchar, Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, DePaul University
Francis Cardinal George, OMI, Archbishop of Chicago
First Plenary Session: Archbishop Celestino Migliore Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations

Economy of Communion I: 
Moderator: Thomas Judge, J.D., Chaplain, University Ministry, DePaul University
Speaker: Amy Uelmen, "Caritas in Veritate and Chiara Lubich: Human Development from the Vantage Point of Unity"
In Caritas in Veritate Pope Benedict writes: "When we consider the issues involved in the relationship between business and ethics, as well as the evolution currently taking place in methods of production, it would appear that the traditionally valid distinction between profit-based companies and non-profit organizations can no longer do full justice to reality, or offer practical direction for the future. In recent decades a broad intermediate area has emerged between the two types of enterprise. It is made up of traditional companies which nonetheless subscribe to social aid agreements in support of underdeveloped countries, charitable foundations associated with individual companies, groups of companies oriented towards social welfare, and the diversified world of the so-called “civil economy” and the “economy of communion”. This is not merely a matter of a "third sector", but of a broad new composite reality embracing the private and public spheres, one which does not exclude profit, but instead considers it a means for achieving human and social ends (CIV#46)."

Taking the economy of communion as developed by Chiara Lubich, the founder of the ecclesial movement Focolare, and her followers as the chief example, these two sessions will examine the theoretical and practical implications of the idea of a “broad new composite reality embracing the private and public spheres” and try to assess the broader significance of the entrepreneurship of the Focolare for other innovators in the Church and the world. They will address the question of how this plurality of forms of business expands civilization and competitiveness.

Graduate Student Panel: Caritas in Veritate in the Eyes of the Next Generation of Theologians I 
Moderator: Robert Wilken, Senior Research Fellow, CWCIT, DePaul University
Speakers: Horacio Vela,University of Notre Dame "Pope Benedict XVI's Use of Scripture in Caritas in Veritate"
Miguel Jose Romero, Duke University, “Caritas in Veritate and the Interpretive Tradition of Populorum Progressio.”

Gratuitousness as a Question for Economic Theory and Political Economy I: "Will Understanding the Principle of Gratuitousness Help Save the Soul of a Lapsed Economist?"
Moderator: Thomas D.Donley, DePaul University
Presenter: Theodore Tsukahara Saint Mary's College
Response: Michael Naughton, University of St. Thomas
One of the most perplexing and tantalizing sections of the encyclical deals with the economic theory of gratuitousness: "The great challenge before us, accentuated by the problems of development in this global era and made even more urgent by the economic and financial crisis, is to demonstrate, in thinking and behaviour, not only that traditional principles of social ethics like transparency, honesty and responsibility cannot be ignored or attenuated, but also that in commercial relationships the principle of gratuitousness and the logic of gift as an expression of fraternity can and must find their place within normal economic activity. This is a human demand at the present time, but it is also demanded by economic logic. It is a demand both of charity and of truth (CIV#36)." These sessions will look at the theoretical work done by economists on the logic of the gift and lay out a program for furthering this critical area of research.

Theology and the Economy I:
Moderator: Peter Casarella, DePaul University
Speaker: Paulo Fernando Carneiro de Andrade
Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro 
In the encyclical Pope Benedict XVI states that both theology and metaphysics are needed to explore the depths of the claim that the human person possesses and represents a transcendent dimension of human dignity and human relationality. Yet the conversation between academic theology and the social scientific disciplines that are also required to understand the implications of this claim for daily economic life has hardly begun. Three noteworthy theologians will explore the contribution of Caritas in Veritate to the on-going discussion of the relationship of theology and economics as well as the ways in which the encyclical itself can be understood more fully in the light of those conversations.

Catholicism and Global Order I: 
Moderator: Stephen Long, Marquette University
Speaker: Michael Budde
A prime motive of the encyclical was to speak to the signs of the times in a period of rapidly expanding economic globalization, but the publication of the document was delayed by the global economic crisis. In addition, the mere mention of "urgent need of a true world political authority" has sent shock waves through some quarters. These sessions will examine the approach to economic globalization in the encyclical and seek to develop a critically nuanced approach to the question of world government adumbrated in the newest addition to Catholic social teaching.

Women, the Family, and Economic Justice I:
Moderator: David Schindler, Provost/Dean, Pontifical John Paul II
Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family at The Catholic University of America
Julie Hanlon Rubio, Practicing Gratuity: A Vision for Families and the Social Order
Respect for life is one of the key issues besides the progress of peoples that binds Paul VI and Benedict XVI as theological contributors to Catholic social teaching. The link between "life ethics" and "social ethics" thus becomes a leitmotif of Caritas in Veritate. But apart from the central questions of abortion and Christian marriage and the passing mention of the growing popularity of international sex tourism, there is precious little in the encyclical about either injustices against women or women as workers or as agents of economic change. These sessions will assess the advances and the challenges regarding the approach taken to the situation of women across the globe in the encyclical and seek to address these issues in the light of the common aspirations of men, women, and families in the Catholicism and in the world today.​​

Economy of Communion II:
Moderator: Peter Casarella, DePaul University
Speaker: Lorna Gold,Trócaire: Mobilising for Justice “From 'Spirituality of Communion' to 'Economy of Communion' - the Evolution of a New Economic Culture” 

Microfinancing II: Educating for Social Awareness, Development of a Housing Infra-Structure, and Promotion of Micro-Enterprise Partnerships
Moderator: Ali Fatemi, Chair, Finance Department, DePaul University
Speakers: Karim Pakravan, “Developing a Housing Infra-Structure”
Karen Hunt-Ahmed, “Promoting Micro-Enterprise”
Nicholas Lund-Molfese, “Partnering with the Archdiocese of Chicago”
John Rush, Clenslate Chicago and John Buley, Vicepresident of Social Investent, JP Morgan, Chase, “Developing Alliances for Social Investing”
Microfinancing is identified in Caritas in Veritate as an ethical form of business activity. But the Pope also adds the following caution: “It would be advisable, however, to develop a sound criterion of discernment, since the adjective 'ethical' can be abused. When the word is used generically, it can lend itself to any number of interpretations, even to the point where it includes decisions and choices contrary to justice and authentic human welfare (CIV#45).“ These sessions will look at the encyclical from the standpoint of microcredit and microfinancing projects on the ground. What can be learned about the ethical principles adumbrated in the encyclical from the concrete practice of microfinancing? What does the practice of microfinancing reveal about the problem of discernment highlighted by the Pope?

Gratuitousness as a Question for Economic Theory and Political Economy II:
Moderator: Ted Tsukahara, Saint Mary's College
Speaker: Michael Naughton, University of St. Thomas "The Logic of Gift: Engaging Caritas in veritate with the Purpose of the Firm.”

Theology and the Economy II: 
Moderator: Scott Paeth, Religious Studies, DePaul University
Presenters: Thomas O'Brien, Religious Studies, DePaul University, "An analysis of the use of Caritas as a Theme of Catholic Social Theory"
Keith Lemna, Saint Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology, "Human Ecology, Environmental Ecology and a Ressourcement Theology:Caritas in Veritate in the Light of Philip Sherrard’s Theandric Anthropology" 

Catholicism and Global Order II: Issues and Controversies Regarding the Pope Benedict's Mention of an "Urgent Need of a True World Political Authority" in Caritas in Veritate. 
Moderator: Molly Andolina, Political Science, DePaul University
Speakers: Patrick Callahan, Depaul University, "Catholicism and world government: 'Caritas in Veritate' in historical context"
Mary Ann Cusimano Love, The Catholic University of America
Response: Gary D. Glenn, Northern Illinois University

Women, the Family, and Economic Justice II: 
Moderator: Gemma Cruz, Depaul University
Speaker: Maria Clara Luchetti Bingemer, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro
The Integrity of Creation and Sustainable Development: Approaches to the True, the Good, and the Beautiful 
Scott Kelley, DePaul University
Elizabeth Milian, DePaul University
Ron Nahser, DePaul University

Charity in Truth and the Current State of Globalization 
Moderator: Michael Budde, DePaul University
Speakers: William Cavanaugh, Professor of Catholic Studies and Senior Research Fellow, CWCIT, DePaul University "Dispersed Political Authority: Subsidiarity and Globalization in Caritas in Veritate"
Simona Beretta, Catholic University of Milan
"Caritas in veritate as a challenge to “dualistic” economic thinking" 

Public Forum for Young Catholics: The Experience of Christ and the Social Witness of the Ecclesial Movements 
Moderator: Peter Casarella, DePaul University
Benita Antony, DePaul University
Elizabeth Garlow, Acción USA
Carolina Brito, Columbia University

April 22, 2010

Moderator: Robert Schreiter, Catholic Theological Union
Speaker: Roberto Goizueta, Boston College
The Christological Center of Caritas in Veritate

Microfinancing in Haiti:
Moderator: Marco Tavanti, Chair, International Public Service, DePaul University
Speakers: Laura Hartman, Vincent de Paul Professor of Business Ethics and Legal Studies, DePaul University
Eduardo Almeida, Interamerican Development Bank and Vice President for the South America, Equatorial Zone North, Saint Vincent de Paul Society

Economy of Communion III: 
Moderator: Karen Hunt-Ahmed, DePaul University 
Speaker: John Mundell , President and CEO, MUNDELL & ASSOCIATES, INC " The Business of Working in Communion: The Art of Building Relationships within an Economy of Communion Company”

Graduate Student Panel: Caritas in Veritate in the Eyes of the Next Generation of Theologians II
Moderator: Neomi DeAnda, DePaul University
Panelists: Kevin Considine, Loyola University Chicago, "The Color of Human Development: The Modern Racial Imagination’s Challenge to 'Caritas in Veritate"
Matthew Philipp Whelan, Duke University "Agriculture and the ‘Grammar’ of Creation"
Carolina Brito, Columbia University

Theology and the Economy III:
Moderator: Paulo Fernando Carneiro de Andrade, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro 
Speaker: Stephen Long ,Marquette University, "Profit Maximization and the Death of God: Theology and Economics in Benedict XVI's Charity in Truth"

Women, the Family, and Economic Justice III 
Moderator: Mary Jeanne Larrabee, Professor of Philosophy and Director, Peace, Conflict, Resolution and Social Justice Program, Depaul University
Speaker: Gemma Cruz, DePaul University, "Tradition in Liberation: Women and the Transnational Family in the Global Economy"

Introduction: Farrell O'Gorman, Catholic Studies, DePaul University
David L. Schindler, Provost/Dean, John Paul II Institute for Studies of Marriage and the Family at The Catholic University of America, "The Anthropological Unity of Caritas in Veritate and its Implications for Economic and Cultural Life Today"

Rev. Dennis H. Holtschneider, C.M., President, DePaul University
Final Plenary: Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson
President of Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace
Closing Reflection: Francis Cardinal George, OMI 
Archbishop of Chicago

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April 23, 2010, Friday - Integrity of Creation: Sustainability & Catholic Higher Education

We are fortunate to be able to coordinate this event alongside the Earth Week activities organized by the DePaul Initiative on Sustainability. The conversation on April 23rd is about sustainability in light of the Catholic identity of DePaul and the mission of higher education. The day will begin with a presentation by John L. Allen, Jr., author and journalist, speaking on “Pope Benedict XVI and Environmentalism.” Mr. Allen has covered the “greening of Catholic thought and activism” in his writings.(Sample coverage) The rest of the day will be dedicated to responses to Allen’s presentation from experts in the field and from DePaul faculty seeking to augment the DePaul curriculum to prepare for a more sustainable future. 

Schedule & Session Descriptions

Integrity of Creation: Sustainability and Catholic Higher Education 
Friday, April 23, 2010

This gathering is scheduled as part of DePaul’s celebration of Earth Week and is intended for those who would like to pursue the question of environmental sustainability in light of the Catholic and Vincentian identity of DePaul and the mission of Catholic higher education more generally. It will prepare faculty and staff who are writing a mission statement for DePaul on the question of sustainability to integrate Catholic intellectual traditions into their process of reflection.

Purpose

These sessions are open to the general public. Students are welcome to participate. In particular, they will enable faculty and staff at DePaul who are currently preparing a mission statement for DePaul on the question of sustainability to integrate Catholic intellectual traditions into their process of reflection. The presentations and panels in the morning will put some ideas on the table about how to think about the problem of sustainability in the light of the Catholic heritage understood in the broadest sense of the term and with particular attention being paid to the Vincentian contribution to that heritage. In the afternoon the participants will gather in workshops to flesh out some of the practical implications of these ideas in terms of their own interests and disciplines.

Schedule

Sustainability and Catholic Mission
John Allen – National Catholic Reporter Correspondent

"Pope Benedict XVI and Environmentalism"
Respondents:
John Mundell, Mundell and Associates 
Barbara Willard, School of Communication
Mark Potosnak, Environmental Science

Sustainability and the DePaul Curriculum
Marco Tavanti, School of Public Service, DePaul University
Kelly Tzoumis, Department of Public Policy Studies, DePaul University
Julie Hwang, Department of Geography, DePaul University
Charles Suchar, Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences, DePaul University​


Conference Speakers

John Allen
Senior Correspondent, National Catholic Reporter

Eduardo Almeida
Interamerican Development Bank and Vice President for the South America, Equatorial Zone North
St. Vincent de Paul Society

Paulo Fernando Carneiro de Andrade
Vice Dean, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro

James Brian Benestad
Department of Theology, University of Scranton

Simona Beretta
Ordinary Professor of International Economics and Policy, Political Science Faculty
Sacro Cuore Catholic University (Milan)

Maria Clara Bingemer

Dean, Center of Theology and Human Sciences
Associate Professor of Theology
Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Michael Budde
Senior Research Professor, CWCIT and Professor of Catholic Studies, DePaul University


Patrick Callahan
Professor of Political Science, DePaul University

Peter Casarella
Professor, Catholic Studies and Director, CWCIT, DePaul University

William Cavanaugh
Professor of Catholic Studies and Senior Research Professor, CWCIT, DePaul University

Gemma Cruz
Visiting Assistant Professor of Catholic Studies, DePaul University

Maryann Cusimano Love
Associate Professor of International Relations, The Catholic University of America
Fellow, Commission on International Religious Freedom

Allan Figueroa Deck, SJ
Executive Director, Secretariat of Cultural Diversity in the Church
U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops

Cardinal Francis George, OMI
Archbishop of Chicago

Gary D. Glenn
Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Northern Illinois University

Robert Goizueta Jr.

Margaret O'Brien Flatley Professor of Catholic Theology, Boston College


Lorna Gold

Policy and Advocacy Manager, Trócaire: Mobilising for Justice (Official Overseas Development Agency of the Catholic Church of Ireland)

Laura Hartman
Vincent de Paul Professor of Business Ethics and Legal Studies, DePaul University

Karen Hunt-Ahmed
Assistant Professor of Finance and Management, DePaul University

Julie Hwang

Assistant Professor of Geography, DePaul University

Scott Kelley
Assistant Vice President for Vincentian Scholarship, Office of Mission & Values, DePaul University

Mark Laboe

Associate Vice President for University Ministry,  DePaul University

Keith Lemna

Visiting Assistant Professor of Systematic Theology, Saint Meinrad Seminary and School of Theology

Stephen Long

Professor of Systematic Theology, Marquette University

Archbishop Celestino Migliore

Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations


Elizabeth Millan

Associate Professor of Philosophy, DePaul University 


James Montgomery

Associate Professor and Director of Environmental Science Program, DePaul University 


John Mundell

President and CEO, MUNDELL & ASSOCIATES, INC


Ron Nahser

Senior Wicklander Fellow, Institute for Business and Professional Ethics, DePaul University


Michael Naughton

Professor and Moss Chair in Catholic Social Thought, University of St. Thomas


Thomas O'Brien

Associate Professor of Religious Studies, DePaul University


Francisco Gearóid Ó Conaire, OFM

Executive Secretary, Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation
Commission of the Union of Major Superiors and the International Union of Major Superiors


Siobhan O'Donoghue

Associate Director for Community Service, DePaul University


Mark Potosnak

Assistant Professor, Environmental Science Program, DePaul University


Julie Hanlon Rubio

Associate Professor of Theology, St. Louis University


John Rush

Managing Director, Cleanslate Chicago


Sr. Damien Marie Savino, FSE

Assistant Professor & Chair of the Environmental Science & Studies, University of St. Thomas (Houston)


David L. Schindler

Provost/Dean & Edouard Cardinal Gagnon Professor of Fundamental Theology
Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage & Family, The Catholic University of America


Marco Tavanti

Associate Professor and Chair of International Public Service (IPS) Graduate Program, DePaul University


Theodore Tsukahara

Director, Integral Program of Liberal Arts
Director, John F. Henning Institute and Professor of Economics
Saint Mary's College


Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson

President of Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace


Kelly Tzoumis

Professor & Chair, Department of Public Policy Studies, DePaul University


Amy Uelmen

Director of the Institute on Religion, Law & Lawyer's Work, Fordham University


Barbara Willard

Associate Professor of Communication, DePaul University