College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences > Academics > American Studies > Undergraduate > American Studies (BA) > Concentration Requirements

Concentration Requirements

Social and Literary Movements Concentration

The Social and Literary Movements concentration focuses upon two areas of study: major cultural products by the principal novelists, philosophers, poets, political and religious thinkers, historians, artists, musicians and intellectuals in American history; and major cultural movements which have shaped the world view and attitudes of literate Americans in American history.

In the first area of focus, a heavy emphasis will be given to individual creative work, its form and content, its specific antecedents and influences as well as its later impact, and the cultural and philosophical implications of the document itself. The relationship between each work and larger trends of the period, both cultural and social, will also be explored.

In the second field of study, the focus will be upon broader cultural movements which are diffused through the larger literate society, which include major cultural documents as well as popular expressions of these ideas, beliefs and attitudes. Thus, the focus here is on the cultural reception and diffusion of ideas, the relation between innovative movements and mainstream belief systems and attitudes, and the nature and direction of cultural exchange.

Concentration Courses

Please note that the below list of possible courses is not exhaustive and that many courses listed under "TOPICS" headings may also count toward American Studies. Students may take an unlimited number of TOPICS courses, as long as the topic of each course is different.​

Students must choose six courses from the following; however, exceptions may be granted by the Director of the American Studies Program. No more than three courses may be from any one department (AMS notwithstanding); at least two courses should be at the 300-level.​​

American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AMS 150
PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN IDENTITIES
AMS 220
AMERICAN BUDDHISMS: RACE AND RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY
AMS 250
IN THEIR OWN VOICES: AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY
AMS 261
AMERICAN ETHNICITIES 1800-1945
AMS 275
HISTORY OF SEX IN AMERICA 1: COLONIAL TO LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY
AMS 276
HISTORY OF SEX IN AMERICA 2: LATE VICTORIANS TO THE PRESENT
AMS 290
AMERICAN VOICES: TO 1860
AMS 291
AMERICAN VOICES: FROM 1860 ONWARD
AMS 298
TOPICS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND LITERARY MOVEMENTS
AMS 387
ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES IN THE U.S./AMERICAS
AMS 388
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND LITERARY MOVEMENTS
AMS 395
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES

Asian American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AAS 203
ASIAN AMERICAN ARTS AND CULTURE

African & Black Diaspora Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
ABD 220
BLACKS AND LOVE
ABD 233
SURVEY OF AFRICAN DIASPORIC INTELLECTUAL THOUGHT
ABD 234
BLACK AESTHETIC THOUGHT
ABD 235
HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND NEGRITUDE
ABD 241
RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA
ABD 245
RACE AND ETHNICITY IN LITERARY STUDIES
ABD 249
JAZZ AND THE DIASPORIC IMAGINATION
ABD 260
DIMENSIONS OF BLACK FAMILY LIFE
ABD 275
BLACK FEMINIST THEORIES IN A U.S. CONTEXT
ABD 351
RECONSTRUCTION AND THE RISE OF JIM CROW
ABD 365
VOTING, REPRESENTATION, AND THE LAW
ABD 372
AFRICAN AMERICAN DRAMA AND POETRY

Economics

Course Title Quarter Hours
ECO 340
DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

English

Course Title Quarter Hours
ENG 265
THE AMERICAN NOVEL
ENG 271
AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 272
LITERATURE AND IDENTITY
ENG 276
LATINX LITERATURE
ENG 285
LGBTQ LITERATURE
ENG 345
TOPICS IN 19TH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 351
POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE
ENG 360
AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1830
ENG 361
19TH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 362
AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1865 TO 1920
ENG 363
AMERICAN LITERATURE AFTER 1900
ENG 364
TOPICS IN GENRE STUDIES
ENG 365
TOPICS IN 20TH-CENTURY FICTION
ENG 367
TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES
ENG 369
TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 371
TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 373
MULTIETHNIC LITERATURE OF THE U.S.
ENG 374
NATIVE LITERATURE
ENG 375
STUDIES IN SHORT FICTION 1
ENG 383
WOMEN AND LITERATURE 1
ENG 384
TOPICS IN LATINX LITERATURE
ENG 385
TOPICS IN LGBTQ LITERATURE
ENG 465
STUDIES IN THE MODERN AMERICAN NOVEL 1

History

Course Title Quarter Hours
HST 243
HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE U.S.
HST 246
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1800
HST 247
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1800-1900
HST 248
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1900 TO PRESENT
HST 254
AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY
HST 270
U.S. HISTORICAL LANDSCAPE
HST 278
HISTORY OF AMERICAN RELIGION
HST 279
WESTWARD EXPANSION IN U.S.
HST 301
U.S. LABOR HISTORY
HST 313
THE OLD SOUTH
HST 319
IMMIGRANT AMERICA
HST 346
AFRICAN-AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY
HST 354
U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY
HST 370
AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY
HST 372
ANTEBELLUM AMERICA
HST 373
THE CIVIL WAR ERA
HST 374
EMERGENCE OF MODERN AMERICA, 1877-1914
HST 375
THE GREAT DEPRESSION AND THE NEW DEAL ERA
HST 376
THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1940
HST 379
RECONSTRUCTION AND THE RISE OF JIM CROW
HST 383
BORDERLANDS AND FRONTIERS IN AMERICA
HST 394
AFRICAN-AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY

Latin American & Latino Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
LST 202
CONSTRUCTING LATINO COMMUNITIES
LST 113
LATINO RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE IN THE UNITED STATES
LST 307
GROWING UP LATINO/LATINA IN THE U.S.
LST 300
SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
LST 303
BORDER MATTERS:LITERATURE & CULTURE IN THE LATINO/A BORDERLANDS
LST 309
SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND LATINO FAMILIES
LST 310
SPECIAL TOPICS: LATINOS IN THE U.S.
LST 330
LATINOS IN EDUCATION

Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
PAX 102
CHICAGO AND STRATEGIC NONVIOLENCE
PAX 200
COMMUNITIES WORKING FOR SUSTAINABLE JUSTICE AND PEACE: SERVICE IN CHICAGO AND THE U.S.

Philosophy

Course Title Quarter Hours
PHL 232
WHAT IS FREEDOM?
PHL 376
AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY

Political Science

Course Title Quarter Hours
PSC 120
THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SYSTEM
PSC 216
AMERICAN POLITICAL CULTURE
PSC 217
WOMEN AND POLITICS
PSC 218
AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICS
PSC 336
AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT
PSC 367
IMMIGRATION LAW

Religion

Course Title Quarter Hours
REL 111
THE AMERICAN RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
REL 115
THE AFRICAN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
REL 161
NATIVE AMERICAN RELIGIONS
REL 218
BLACK INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS
REL 219
SLAVERY, RACE AND RELIGION
REL 224
RELIGION AND POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES

Women’s & Gender Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
WGS 212
GROWING UP FEMALE IN THE U.S.
WGS 303
GENDER, VIOLENCE AND RESISTANCE
WGS 305
MOTHERING, WORK, AND REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE
WGS 306
GENDER AND FAMILIES
WGS 314
ANTIRACIST FEMINISMS
WGS 320
TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE: THEORY AND PRACTICE
WGS 355
WOMEN AND ART
WGS 364
POLITICAL AUTOBIOGRAPHY
WGS 378
UTOPIAN AND DYSTOPIAN LITERATURE AND FILM: GENDER, RACE AND BEYOND

Portfolio Requirement

Students are encouraged to maintain an active record of documents from their concentration courses, including syllabi, completed written course work, collections of visuals, e.g., photo essays -- whatever is appropriate to the six courses chosen for the concentration. Students will use these documents to aid them in writing reflective essays during the initial weeks of their senior seminar. These essays might ask you to consider “What were the course’s most valuable lessons in research, analysis, writing and communication? How did this course, taken together with the other courses you have chosen for your concentration, influence/develop y our understanding of the area of American culture on which you are focusing?” These essays, a long with representative assignments, will form the student's American Studies "portfolio." Students turn in their portfolio on the concentration, along with a proposal for the senior seminar project, in the first weeks of the senior seminar, AMS 301. Specific directions for the portfolio can be obtained from your American Studies advisor, from the American Studies Program office, or from the American Studies Program Director.​​

Open Electives​

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours. ​​

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Popular Culture and Media Studies Concentration

The Popular Culture and Media Studies concentration in American Studies offers students an opportunity to explore the rich and complex role popular culture has played and continues to play in American life. In contrast to high culture or folk culture forms, "popular culture" generally refers to those commercialized leisure activities or arts that are broadly accessible to most Americans, either through their mass media production (music, radio, film, television, novels, newspapers, magazines, fashion) or wide availability (amusement parks, concerts, sports, Broadway shows, shopping malls, internet sites). Since the end of the nineteenth century, American culture has been defined through its popular arts, most obviously Hollywood films and television programs, and American popular culture and media products have had enormous effects on American identity.

Four broad sets of questions underpin our examination of American popular culture and media. First, what does our close examination of the formal elements of cultural products - their written and visual texts, their physical shapes and sounds - tell us about their specific cultural effects and meanings, both during the historical period in which they were produced and in the present? Second, how does examining the development processes and industrial histories of cultural products help us better understand their political, economic, technological, and social implications? Third, what does the reception of these products by audiences, either through live performances or mass media, tell us about their impact on the formation of American identities (gender, racial, sexual), values, and opinions? Finally, how does studying the history of American popular culture help us critically assess our current cultural politics and the role American popular culture continues to play in our understanding of ourselves as individuals, as members of social groups, and as national and international citizens?

In this concentration, students integrate courses from a number of disciplines, combining those that offer broad surveys of cultural development as well as close examinations of particular cultural products; students should also look for courses that offer a variety of methodological approaches to studying American popular culture.

Concentration Courses

Please note that the below list of possible courses is not exhaustive and that many courses listed under "TOPICS" headings may also count toward American Studies. Students may take an unlimited number of TOPICS courses, as long as the topic of each course is different.

Students must choose six courses from the following; however, exceptions may be granted by the Director of the American Studies Program. No more than three courses may be from any one department (AMS notwithstanding); at least two courses should be at the 300-level.

American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AMS 150
PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN IDENTITIES
AMS 202
UNITED STATES POPULAR MUSIC HISTORY
AMS 250
IN THEIR OWN VOICES: AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY
AMS 285
HISTORY AND U.S. POPULAR MEDIA
AMS 290
AMERICAN VOICES: TO 1860
AMS 291
AMERICAN VOICES: FROM 1860 ONWARD
AMS 296
TOPICS IN AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE AND MEDIA
AMS 340
AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE: 1890s - 1930s
AMS 352
SEX, GENDER AND SOCIAL MEDIA
AMS 380
TELEVISION AND AMERICAN IDENTITY
AMS 386
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE AND MEDIA
AMS 387
ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES IN THE U.S./AMERICAS

African & Black Diaspora Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
ABD 235
HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND NEGRITUDE
ABD 249
JAZZ AND THE DIASPORIC IMAGINATION
ABD 320
AFRICAN AMERICAN SCIENCE FICTION
ABD 371
AFRICAN- AMERICAN FICTION
ABD 372
AFRICAN AMERICAN DRAMA AND POETRY
ABD 375
RACE, MEDIA, AND REPRESENTATION

Anthropology

Course Title Quarter Hours
ANT 250
MATERIAL CULTURE OF MODERN AMERICA

Asian American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AAS 203
ASIAN AMERICAN ARTS AND CULTURE

Communication and Communication Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
CMN 102
INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION
CMNS 230
PERFORMANCE: COMMUNICATION, CREATIVITY AND THE BODY
CMNS 301
AUDIO DOCUMENTARY
CMNS 305
PERFORMANCE STUDIES
CMNS 308
TOPICS IN INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
CMNS 326
ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND RHETORIC
CMNS 339
PERFORMANCE OF GENDER & SEXUALITY

English

Course Title Quarter Hours
ENG 265
THE AMERICAN NOVEL
ENG 360
AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1830
ENG 361
19TH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 362
AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM 1865 TO 1920
ENG 364
TOPICS IN GENRE STUDIES
ENG 365
TOPICS IN 20TH-CENTURY FICTION
ENG 373
MULTIETHNIC LITERATURE OF THE U.S.
ENG 374
NATIVE LITERATURE

History of Art and Architecture

Course Title Quarter Hours
HAA 265
HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

History

Course Title Quarter Hours
HST 381
AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE 1890s-1930s 1

Intercultural Communication

Course Title Quarter Hours
CMNS 230
PERFORMANCE: COMMUNICATION, CREATIVITY AND THE BODY
CMNS 321
CULTURAL AND SYMBOLIC CRITICISM
CMNS 324
CULTURE OF CONSUMPTION
CMNS 337
ASIAN-AMERICAN MEDIA REPRESENTATIONS

Journalism

Course Title Quarter Hours
JOUR 343
JOURNALISM AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
JOUR 361
JOURNALISM LAW AND ETHICS
JOUR 362
THE PRESS AND THE PRESIDENCY

Media & Cinema Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
MCS 207
HISTORY OF CINEMA I, 1890-1945
MCS 208
HISTORY OF CINEMA II, 1945-1975
MCS 209
HISTORY OF CINEMA III, 1975-PRESENT
MCS 271
MEDIA AND CULTURAL STUDIES
MCS 273
STORYTELLING & STYLE IN CINEMA
MCS 342
HISTORY OF TELEVISION & RADIO
MCS 343
MEDIA ETHICS
MCS 344
THE SEXUAL REVOLUTION: HOLLYWOOD IN THE 1960s
MCS 351
TOPICS IN TELEVISION STUDIES 1
MCS 355
SEX IN THE BOX: U.S. TELEVISION, SEX, AND SEXUALITY
MCS 361
FANDOM & PARTICIPATORY CULTURE
MCS 366
COMMUNICATION, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY
MCS 383
TALKING ABOUT FILM: THEORY & CRITICISM

Public Relations & Advertising

Course Title Quarter Hours
PRAD 244
PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING
PRAD 335
DIVERSITY & CURRENT ISSUES IN ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

Political Science

Course Title Quarter Hours
PSC 321
MASS MEDIA AND AMERICAN POLITICS
PSC 327
PUBLIC OPINION

Religion

Course Title Quarter Hours
REL 212
RELIGION AND POPULAR CULTURE 1

Sociology

Course Title Quarter Hours
SOC 233
SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT
SOC 280
MASS MEDIA AND CULTURE
SOC 281
SOCIOLOGY OF ROCK MUSIC
SOC 383
VISUAL SOCIOLOGY
SOC 386
POPULAR CULTURE AND THE ARTS
SOC 387
SOCIOLOGY OF CELEBRITY

Theater

Course Title Quarter Hours
ACT 100
POLITICS, POP CULTURE, AND THE STAGE

Women's and Gender Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
WGS 255
DECONSTRUCTING THE DIVA

Portfolio Requirement

Students are encouraged to maintain an active record of documents from their concentration courses, including syllabi, completed written course work, collections of visuals, e.g., photo essays -- whatever is appropriate to the six courses chosen for the concentration. Students will use these documents to aid them in writing reflective essays during the initial weeks of their senior seminar. These essays might ask you to consider “What were the course’s most valuable lessons in research, analysis, writing and communication? How did this course, taken together with the other courses you have chosen for your concentration, influence/develop your understanding of the area of American culture on which you are focusing?” These essays, along with representative assignments, will form the student's American Studies "portfolio." Students turn in their portfolio on the concentration, along with a proposal for the senior seminar project, in the first weeks of the senior seminar, AMS 301. Specific directions for the portfolio can be obtained from your American Studies advisor, from the American Studies Program office, or from the American Studies Program Director.

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours. ​

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Politics, Institutions and Values Concentration

Students in the Politics, Institutions, and Values concentration examine the structural and cultural processes that shape the distribution of power and resources, and supply the cultural meanings for U.S. society. Courses in this concentration explore a variety of American institutions and social processes, among them the political system, the economy, the educational system, the health care arena, the justice system and numerous other cultural and social spheres. Students will study the dynamic relations among these realms in courses ranging from traditional disciplines, like Political Science and Sociology, to those within interdisciplinary programs such as Women's and Gender Studies and, of course, American Studies.

This concentration particularly encourages students to choose courses that emphasize an historical perspective in order to better understand the interplay of individuals, social groups and subcultures as they shape and are shaped by various institutions over time. An historical perspective also allows for comparisons among traditional, modern and contemporary methodologies for conceptualizing American society. Ultimately, students in the Politics, Institutions and Values concentration should develop the critical skills with which to analyze the complexity of the conflicts among these institutions and processes and their diverse participants, among ruling elites, their members and outsiders, and between the official discourses and the complex real outcomes.

Concentration Courses

Please note that the below list of possible courses is not exhaustive and that many courses listed under "TOPICS" headings may also count toward American Studies. Students may take an unlimited number of TOPICS courses, as long as the topic of each course is different.

Students must choose six courses from the following; however, exceptions may be granted by the Director of the American Studies Program. No more than three courses may be from any one department (AMS notwithstanding); at least two courses should be at the 300-level.

American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AMS 150
PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN IDENTITIES
AMS 220
AMERICAN BUDDHISMS: RACE AND RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY
AMS 240
CHICAGO HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, AND CULTURES
AMS 275
HISTORY OF SEX IN AMERICA 1: COLONIAL TO LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY
AMS 276
HISTORY OF SEX IN AMERICA 2: LATE VICTORIANS TO THE PRESENT
AMS 280
POLITICS AND HISTORY OF THE VIETNAM WAR
AMS 294
TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS, INSTITUTIONS, AND VALUES
AMS 380
TELEVISION AND AMERICAN IDENTITY
AMS 387
ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES IN THE U.S./AMERICAS
AMS 394
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS, INSTITUTIONS, AND VALUES

African & Black Diaspora Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
ABD 218
AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICS
ABD 260
DIMENSIONS OF BLACK FAMILY LIFE
ABD 305
PAN-AFRICANISM
ABD 336
AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT
ABD 351
RECONSTRUCTION AND THE RISE OF JIM CROW
ABD 365
VOTING, REPRESENTATION, AND THE LAW
ABD 369
TOPICS IN PUBLIC LAW

Asian American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AAS 200
ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORY

Community Service Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
CSS 310
RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: ENGAGEMENT WITH THE PRISON
CSS 320
COMMUNITY FOOD SYSTEMS
CSS 350
CRITCAL ISSUES IN PUBLIC EDUCATION: THE CHICAGO CONTEXT

Economics

Course Title Quarter Hours
ECO 310
URBAN ECONOMICS
ECO 313
MARKET STRUCTURE AND REGULATION OF BUSINESS
ECO 317
AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY
ECO 318
LABOR ECONOMICS AND ORGANIZATION
ECO 319
ECONOMICS AND GENDER
ECO 335
SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES FOR ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Geography

Course Title Quarter Hours
GEO 103
URBANIZATION
GEO 201
GEOPOLITICS
GEO 205
RACE, JUSTICE, AND THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT
GEO 210
ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION
GEO 330
SUSTAINABLE URBAN TRANSPORTATION
GEO 269
CULTURAL AND POLITICAL ECOLOGY
GEO 231
HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF CHICAGO
GEO 333
URBAN PLANNING

History of Art and Architecture

Course Title Quarter Hours
HAA 291
MUSEUM PROFESSION AND PRACTICE: CHICAGO MUSEUMS AS CASE STUDY

History

Course Title Quarter Hours
HST 240
HISTORY OF CHICAGO
HST 243
HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE U.S.
HST 254
AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY
HST 269
MUSEUMS, MATERIAL CULTURE AND MEMORY: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY
HST 270
U.S. HISTORICAL LANDSCAPE
HST 278
HISTORY OF AMERICAN RELIGION
HST 279
WESTWARD EXPANSION IN U.S.
HST 283
ASIAN-AMERICAN IMMIGRATION AND HISTORY, 1840-1965
HST 284
HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES
HST 288
WOMEN IN UNITED STATES HISTORY
HST 301
U.S. LABOR HISTORY
HST 302
MAPS IN HISTORY AND CULTURE
HST 310
INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS
HST 312
LATINOS IN THE UNITED STATES
HST 313
THE OLD SOUTH
HST 354
U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY
HST 370
AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY
HST 371
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION
HST 382
CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM EXPERIENCE

LGBTQ Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
LGQ 319
QUEER PIONEERS: CULTURE, GENDER, AND POLITICAL ACTIVISM
LGQ 332
CREATING CHANGE: CONTEMPORARY GLBT POLITICS
LGQ 338
SEXUAL JUSTICE: LESBIANS, GAYS AND THE LAW

Latin American & Latino Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
LST 113
LATINO RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE IN THE UNITED STATES
LST 202
CONSTRUCTING LATINO COMMUNITIES
LST 305
LATINO COMMUNITIES AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT
LST 306
LATINO COMMUNITIES IN CHICAGO
LST 321
GLOBALIZATION IN THE AMERICAS
LST 348
INDIGENOUS POLITICAL STRUGGLES

Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
PAX 102
CHICAGO AND STRATEGIC NONVIOLENCE
PAX 200
COMMUNITIES WORKING FOR SUSTAINABLE JUSTICE AND PEACE: SERVICE IN CHICAGO AND THE U.S.
PAX 212
SOCIAL JUSTICE AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Public Policy Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
PPS 331
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

Political Science

Course Title Quarter Hours
PSC 120
THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SYSTEM
PSC 216
AMERICAN POLITICAL CULTURE
PSC 217
WOMEN AND POLITICS
PSC 218
AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICS
PSC 219
TOPICS IN POLITICAL CULTURE 1
PSC 220
THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
PSC 221
CONGRESS AND THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS
PSC 223
URBAN POLITICS
PSC 224
BUREAUCRACY AND POLITICS
PSC 225
STATE POLITICS
PSC 242
AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
PSC 260
LAW AND THE POLITICAL SYSTEM
PSC 261
FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS
PSC 262
RIGHTS OF DEFENDANTS
PSC 263
EQUAL PROTECTION OF THE LAWS
PSC 321
MASS MEDIA AND AMERICAN POLITICS
PSC 322
URBAN POLICYMAKING
PSC 323
CHICAGO GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
PSC 324
INEQUALITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY
PSC 327
PUBLIC OPINION
PSC 328
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS
PSC 330
AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT
PSC 339
ADVANCED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THOUGHT 1
PSC 362
THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
PSC 363
WOMEN AND THE LAW

Sociology

Course Title Quarter Hours
SOC 200
SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE
SOC 208
LAW AND SOCIETY
SOC 214
POLICE AND THE URBAN COMMUNITY
SOC 221
INTRODUCTION TO THE U.S HEALTH CARE SYSTEM
SOC 231
RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE CITY
SOC 236
IMMIGRATION, HEALTH AND ILLNESS
SOC 248
WHITE RACISM
SOC 253
SLAVERY AND RACIALIZATION
SOC 310
CRIMINAL- LEGAL SYSTEM: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES
SOC 305
POWER, DEVIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL
SOC 306
SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILIES
SOC 313
SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
SOC 315
LAW, POWER AND RESISTANCE
SOC 316
STREET GANGS
SOC 317
GENDER, CRIME AND JUSTICE
SOC 321
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
SOC 340
SOCIAL INEQUALITY
SOC 344
POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY
SOC 347
CLASS, POWER AND DECISION MAKING IN THE CITY
SOC 351
HEALTH DISPARITIES

Women’s & Gender Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
WGS 100
WOMEN'S LIVES:RACE/CLASS/GENDER
WGS 212
GROWING UP FEMALE IN THE U.S.
WGS 215
GENDER AND EDUCATION
WGS 250
FEMINIST FRAMEWORKS
WGS 275
BLACK FEMINIST THEORIES IN A U.S. CONTEXT
WGS 303
GENDER, VIOLENCE AND RESISTANCE
WGS 306
GENDER AND FAMILIES
WGS 326
WOMEN AND LAW
WGS 388
QUEER THEORY: AN INTRODUCTION

Portfolio Requirement

Throughout the concentration courses, students are required to maintain a “portfolio” which combines reflections on the courses with collections of course materials (syllabi, completed written course work, collections of visuals, e.g., photo essays -- whatever is appropriate to the six courses chosen for the concentration). The reflections on each course and then on the concentration overall should include responses to questions such as “What were the course’s most valuable lessons in research, analysis, writing and communication? How did this course, taken together with the other courses you have chosen for your concentration, influence/develop your understanding of the area of American culture on which you are focusing?” Students turn in their portfolio on the concentration, along with a proposal for the senior seminar project, in the first weeks of the senior seminar. Specific directions for the portfolio can be obtained from your American Studies advisor, from the American Studies Program office, or from the American Studies Program Director.

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours. ​

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Material Culture and the Built Environment Concentration

Students in this concentration study the complex interrelationships among the arts, craft, design, ideas, places, and social and cultural life in America. This concentration allows for the encyclopedic study of things in their historical context, drawing on methodologies and approaches from art and design history, economic history, history of technology, philosophy, anthropology, archaeology, and geography.

The curriculum combines two broad approaches: giving objects prime importance and placing objects in wider social and intellectual contexts. Some courses raise issues related to media, techniques, aesthetics, production and consumption, historiography, and theory, while others focus on the role objects and places play in people’s lives: the planning of cities, parks, and gardens; the design of buildings, interiors, and furnishings; clothing; jewelry and body adornment; the material culture of food, decoration, and ornament; illustration and the graphic arts. Students will explore the ways in which Americans have been shaped by and have shaped their physical environments, from “nature” to the urban environment.

Concentration Courses

Please note that the below list of possible courses is not exhaustive and that many courses listed under "TOPICS" headings may also count toward American Studies. Students may take an unlimited number of TOPICS courses, as long as the topic of each course is different.​

Students must choose six courses from the following; however, exceptions may be granted by the Director of the American Studies Program. No more than three courses may be from any one department (AMS notwithstanding); at least two courses should be at the 300-level.​

American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AMS 150
PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN IDENTITIES
AMS 240
CHICAGO HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, AND CULTURES
AMS 261
AMERICAN ETHNICITIES 1800-1945
AMS 240
CHICAGO HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, AND CULTURES
AMS 293
TOPICS IN AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
AMS 370
THE MATERIAL CULTURE OF MODERN AMERICA
AMS 371
MATERIAL CULTURE OF EARLY AMERICA
AMS 393
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
AMS 387
ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES IN THE U.S./AMERICAS 1
AMS 395
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES 1

African and Black Diaspora Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
ABD 259
THE GREAT MIGRATION AND BLACK IDENTITY
ABD 351
RECONSTRUCTION AND THE RISE OF JIM CROW

Anthropology

Course Title Quarter Hours
ANT 202
ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS
ANT 250
MATERIAL CULTURE OF MODERN AMERICA
ANT 252
MATERIAL CULTURE AND DOMESTIC LIFE
ANT 254
HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY OF CHICAGO
ANT 280
ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELDWORK
ANT 314
ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER
ANT 342
ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD MOVEMENTS AND PRACTICES
ANT 346
URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY
ANT 356
URBAN ETHNOGRAPHY
ANT 358
ARCHEOLOGY OF CITIES
ANT 374
ANTHROPOLOGY AND MUSEUMS
ANT 378
MUSEUM EDUCATION
ANT 382
HERITAGE DISPLAYS AND MUSEUMS

Art

Course Title Quarter Hours
ART 291
MURAL PAINTING
ART 328
DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY

Community Service Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
CSS 310
RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: ENGAGEMENT WITH THE PRISON
CSS 312
LAW AND POLITICS: PRISON POLICIES AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

Environmental Science

Course Title Quarter Hours
ENV 165
NATIONAL PARKS HISTORY
ENV 181
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
ENV 200
CITIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Geography

Course Title Quarter Hours
GEO 101
ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY
GEO 103
URBANIZATION
GEO 133
URBAN GEOGRAPHY - EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
GEO 140
MAPPING WORKSHOP FOR ONLINE STORYTELLING
GEO 141
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS I: DIGITAL MAPPING
GEO 172
CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY
GEO 200
SUSTAINABLE URBAN DEVELOPMENT
GEO 205
RACE, JUSTICE, AND THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT
GEO 206
BOUNDARIES AND IDENTITIES
GEO 210
ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION
GEO 231
HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF CHICAGO
GEO 233
COMPARATIVE URBANISM
GEO 242
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS II: COMMUNITY GIS
GEO 269
CULTURAL AND POLITICAL ECOLOGY
GEO 299
KNOWLEDGE, PLACE AND POWER
GEO 301
ECONOMIC INEQUALITY AND POLITICAL TRAUMA
GEO 339
TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM
GEO 350
WORLD OF WINE
GEO 351
GEOGRAPHY, FOOD AND JUSTICE
GEO 369
RISKS, HAZARDS AND NATURAL DISASTERS

History of Art and Architecture

Course Title Quarter Hours
HAA 145
INTRODUCTION TO ARTS OF THE AMERICAS
HAA 247
MODERN LATIN AMERICAN ART
HAA 260
AMERICAN ART
HAA 265
HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY
HAA 281
MODERN ARCHITECTURE
HAA 288
COMPARATIVE URBANISM
HAA 291
MUSEUM PROFESSION AND PRACTICE: CHICAGO MUSEUMS AS CASE STUDY
HAA 371
HISTORIC CATHOLIC CHURCH ARCHITECTURE OF CHICAGO
HAA 380
CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM (WORLD CITIES)
HAA 391
THE EVOLVING MUSEUM: HISTORIES AND CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES
HAA 394
MUSEUM STUDIES INTERNSHIP

History

Course Title Quarter Hours
HST 240
HISTORY OF CHICAGO
HST 269
MUSEUMS, MATERIAL CULTURE AND MEMORY: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY
HST 270
U.S. HISTORICAL LANDSCAPE
HST 280
HISTORY OF US NATIONAL PARKS
HST 281
IDEAS OF NATURE IN US HISTORY
HST 302
MAPS IN HISTORY AND CULTURE
HST 382
CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM EXPERIENCE
HST 389
TOPICS IN PUBLIC HISTORY
HST 391
DOING LOCAL AND COMMUNITY HISTORY
HST 392
PUBLIC HISTORY INTERNSHIP

International Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
INT 206
IDENTITIES AND BOUNDARIES

Media and Cinema Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
MCS 342
HISTORY OF TELEVISION & RADIO
MCS 344
THE SEXUAL REVOLUTION: HOLLYWOOD IN THE 1960s
MCS 355
SEX IN THE BOX: U.S. TELEVISION, SEX, AND SEXUALITY

Political Science

Course Title Quarter Hours
PSC 201
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
PSC 223
URBAN POLITICS

Public Policy Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
PPS 201
PUBLIC POLICY AND URBAN ISSUES
PPS 250
ISSUES IN NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT
PPS 251
URBAN POVERTY
PPS 332
NATIONAL PARKS POLICY AND GOVERNANCE
PPS 333
GREEN CITIES
PPS 350
ISSUES IN URBAN REDEVELOPMENT
PPS 351
THE POLICY AND POLITICS OF URBAN HOUSING
PPS 360
GREAT LAKES GOVERNANCE POLICY AND MANAGEMENT
PPS 361
PUBLIC SPACES AND SOCIAL CONTROL

Sociology

Course Title Quarter Hours
SOC 231
RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE CITY
SOC 232
GLOBAL CITIES
SOC 246
HOMELESS IN THE CITY
SOC 316
STREET GANGS
SOC 346
URBAN ETHNOGRAPHY
SOC 347
CLASS, POWER AND DECISION MAKING IN THE CITY

Portfolio Requirement

Students are encouraged to maintain an active record of documents from their concentration courses, including syllabi, completed written course work, collections of visuals, e.g., photo essays -- whatever is appropriate to the six courses chosen for the concentration. Students will use these documents to aid them in writing reflective essays during the initial weeks of their senior seminar. These essays might ask you to consider “What were the course’s most valuable lessons in research, analysis, writing and communication? How did this course, taken together with the other courses you have chosen for your concentration, influence/develop your understanding of the area of American culture on which you are focusing?” These essays, along with representative assignments, will form the student's American Studies "portfolio." Students turn in their portfolio on the concentration, along with a proposal for the senior seminar project, in the first weeks of the senior seminar, AMS 301. Specific directions for the portfolio can be obtained from your American Studies advisor, from the American Studies Program office, or from the American Studies Program Director.

Open Electives​

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours. ​

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Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies Concentration

American Studies has taken a central position in the analysis of American ethnicity and race. Early work in this area focused on the history and culture of specific groups, but as the field has developed, inquiry has turned to the theoretical and comparative analysis of race. Courses in this concentration encourage students to explore both the specificity and the diversity of race and ethnicity in American culture by taking some courses that focus on the experience of one racial or ethnic group and others that offer comparative perspectives.

Concentration Courses

Please note that the below list of possible courses is not exhaustive and that many courses listed under "TOPICS" headings may also count toward American Studies. Students may take an unlimited number of TOPICS courses, as long as the topic of each course is different. 

Students must choose six courses from the following; however, exceptions may be granted by the Director of the American Studies Program. No more than three courses may be from any one department (AMS notwithstanding); at least two courses should be at the 300-level.

American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AMS 150
PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICAN IDENTITIES
AMS 220
AMERICAN BUDDHISMS: RACE AND RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY
AMS 230
ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORIES
AMS 240
CHICAGO HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, AND CULTURES
AMS 261
AMERICAN ETHNICITIES 1800-1945
AMS 265
PACIFIC WORLD: NORTH AMERICA AND THE PACIFIC, 1776 - 1945
AMS 297
TOPICS IN AMERICAN RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES
AMS 329
POWER, OPPRESSION, RESISTANCE: APPROACHES TO CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES
AMS 395
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES
AMS 397
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES

Asian American Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
AAS 200
ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORY
AAS 203
ASIAN AMERICAN ARTS AND CULTURE
AAS 205
GLOBAL ASIA
AAS 290
TOPICS IN ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES
AAS 343
JAPANESE AMERICAN HISTORY IN THE US/CHICAGO

African & Black Diaspora Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
ABD 100
INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AND BLACK DIASPORA STUDIES
ABD 208
AFRICAN AMERICA: PEOPLES, CULTURES, IDEAS AND MOVEMENTS
ABD 214
ARCHEOLOGY OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA
ABD 215
THE AFRICAN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
ABD 218
AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICS
ABD 220
BLACKS AND LOVE
ABD 231
PHILOSOPHY AND THE QUESTION OF RACE
ABD 234
BLACK AESTHETIC THOUGHT
ABD 235
HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND NEGRITUDE
ABD 245
RACE AND ETHNICITY IN LITERARY STUDIES
ABD 249
JAZZ AND THE DIASPORIC IMAGINATION
ABD 305
PAN-AFRICANISM
ABD 320
AFRICAN AMERICAN SCIENCE FICTION
ABD 336
AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT
ABD 351
RECONSTRUCTION AND THE RISE OF JIM CROW
ABD 365
VOTING, REPRESENTATION, AND THE LAW
ABD 371
AFRICAN- AMERICAN FICTION
ABD 372
AFRICAN AMERICAN DRAMA AND POETRY
ABD 373
TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN POETRY 1940-1960
ABD 379
BLACK FEMINIST THEORY

Comparative Literature

Course Title Quarter Hours
CPL 312
THE LITERATURE OF IDENTITY 1
CPL 313
FEMINIST LITERATURE 1

Catholic Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
CTH 250
ART IN THE SPANISH AMERICAN EMPIRE
CTH 273
HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE U.S.
CTH 384
THE CULTURE OF AMERICAN CATHOLICS

Community Service Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
CSS 310
RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: ENGAGEMENT WITH THE PRISON
CSS 312
LAW AND POLITICS: PRISON POLICIES AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE
CSS 320
COMMUNITY FOOD SYSTEMS
CSS 350
CRITCAL ISSUES IN PUBLIC EDUCATION: THE CHICAGO CONTEXT

Criminology

Course Title Quarter Hours
CRIM 205
RACE, CLASS, GENDER AND THE CRIMINAL LEGAL SYSTEM
CRIM 208
LATINOS AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Critical Ethnic Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
CES 401
CRITICAL ETHNIC STUDIES
CES 402
MOBILITY AND THE STATE
CES 403
CITIES AND RACIAL FORMATION
CES 404
BORDERS AND MIGRATION
CES 405
RACE AND THE MEDIA

English

Course Title Quarter Hours
ENG 271
AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 272
LITERATURE AND IDENTITY 1
ENG 276
LATINX LITERATURE
ENG 351
POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE
ENG 364
TOPICS IN GENRE STUDIES
ENG 365
TOPICS IN 20TH-CENTURY FICTION
ENG 367
TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES
ENG 369
TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 371
TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 373
MULTIETHNIC LITERATURE OF THE U.S.
ENG 374
NATIVE LITERATURE
ENG 383
WOMEN AND LITERATURE 1
ENG 384
TOPICS IN LATINX LITERATURE

Geography

Course Title Quarter Hours
GEO 103
URBANIZATION
GEO 205
RACE, JUSTICE, AND THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT
GEO 231
HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF CHICAGO

History of Art & Architecture

Course Title Quarter Hours
HAA 145
INTRODUCTION TO ARTS OF THE AMERICAS

History

Course Title Quarter Hours
HST 243
HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE U.S.
HST 246
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1800
HST 247
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1800-1900
HST 248
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1900 TO PRESENT
HST 240
HISTORY OF CHICAGO
HST 312
LATINOS IN THE UNITED STATES
HST 342
TOPICS IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY
HST 346
AFRICAN-AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY
HST 384
TOPICS IN AMERICAN HISTORY
HST 388
THE COURT AND THE U.S. BILL OF RIGHTS
HST 394
AFRICAN-AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY

Latin American & Latino Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
LST 113
LATINO RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE IN THE UNITED STATES
LST 202
CONSTRUCTING LATINO COMMUNITIES
LST 203
MEDIA AND CULTURAL STUDIES ACROSS THE AMERICAS
LST 207
AFRO-CARIBBEAN AND AFRO-LATIN AMERICA: PEOPLES, CULTURES, IDEAS AND MOVEMENTS
LST 209
LATINOS/AS AND THE CRIMINAL LEGAL SYSTEM
LST 208
JEWISH EXPERIENCES IN THE AMERICAS
LST 290
LATINO/A LIBERATION TRADITIONS
LST 303
BORDER MATTERS:LITERATURE & CULTURE IN THE LATINO/A BORDERLANDS
LST 305
LATINO COMMUNITIES AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT
LST 306
LATINO COMMUNITIES IN CHICAGO
LST 307
GROWING UP LATINO/LATINA IN THE U.S.
LST 308
MOTHERHOOD IN LATINO COMMUNITIES
LST 309
SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND LATINO FAMILIES
LST 310
SPECIAL TOPICS: LATINOS IN THE U.S.
LST 312
LATINA/O SEXUALITIES
LST 321
GLOBALIZATION IN THE AMERICAS
LST 330
LATINOS IN EDUCATION
LST 348
INDIGENOUS POLITICAL STRUGGLES

Music

Course Title Quarter Hours
MUS 278
JAZZ

Philosophy

Course Title Quarter Hours
PHL 231
PHILOSOPHY AND RACE

Political Science

Course Title Quarter Hours
PSC 218
AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICS
PSC 223
URBAN POLITICS
PSC 260
LAW AND THE POLITICAL SYSTEM
PSC 261
FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS
PSC 262
RIGHTS OF DEFENDANTS
PSC 263
EQUAL PROTECTION OF THE LAWS
PSC 324
INEQUALITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY
PSC 328
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS
PSC 339
ADVANCED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THOUGHT 1
PSC 362
THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Psychology

Course Title Quarter Hours
PSY 346
PSYCHOLOGY OF THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN CHILD

Religion

Course Title Quarter Hours
REL 221
RELIGION IN SOCIETY
REL 224
RELIGION AND POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES
REL 266
ISLAM IN THE UNTIED STATES
REL 384
THE CULTURE OF AMERICAN CATHOLICS

Sociology

Course Title Quarter Hours
SOC 203
RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS
SOC 214
POLICE AND THE URBAN COMMUNITY
SOC 231
RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE CITY
SOC 248
WHITE RACISM
SOC 253
SLAVERY AND RACIALIZATION
SOC 310
CRIMINAL- LEGAL SYSTEM: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES
SOC 316
STREET GANGS
SOC 340
SOCIAL INEQUALITY
SOC 245
URBAN SOCIOLOGY

Women's and Gender Studies

Course Title Quarter Hours
WGS 255
DECONSTRUCTING THE DIVA
WGS 386
BLACK WOMEN'S EXPERIENCES: VARIABLE TOPICS

Portfolio Requirement

Students are encouraged to maintain an active record of documents from their concentration courses, including syllabi, completed written course work, collections of visuals, e.g., photo essays -- whatever is appropriate to the six courses chosen for the concentration. Students will use these documents to aid them in writing reflective essays during the initial weeks of their senior seminar. These essays might ask you to consider “What were the course’s most valuable lessons in research, analysis, writing and communication? How did this course, taken together with the other courses you have chosen for your concentration, influence/develop your understanding of the area of American culture on which you are focusing?” These essays, along with representative assignments, will form the student's American Studies "portfolio." Students turn in their portfolio on the concentration, along with a proposal for the senior seminar project, in the first weeks of the senior seminar, AMS 301. Specific directions for the portfolio can be obtained from your American Studies advisor, from the American Studies Program office, or from the American Studies Program Director.

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours. ​

Content displayed from this DePaul University catalog page.