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Events

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​​​​​​​​​​Upcoming Events​​​​​​

​​Winter 2023 Events​
Study Nights WQ23
CTH will host five study nights: Jan. 11, Jan. 25, Feb. 8, Feb. 22, and Mar. 8.  The Study Night is an opportunity for students and those interested in CTH courses to meet our professors, learn about course offerings, and study in community. Students can RSVP via EventBrite.​

Autumn 2022 Events

Fall 2022 Study Night
Throughout the fall quarter, CTH hosted five study nights: Sept. 20, Oct. 4, Oct. 18, Nov. 1, and Nov. 15. The Study Nights are an opportunity for students and those interested in CTH courses to meet our professors, learn about course offerings, and study in community.​


Past Events

Navigating Science and Religion: From Conflict to Dialogue with Humility

Thursday, May 19, 2022 at 7:00pm | Arts & Letters Room 409

Navigating Science and Religion

Joe Vukov, an Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Graduate Program Director in the Philosophy Department, published “Navigating Faith and Science” in 2022. He received his PhD in Philosophy from Fordham University in 2016, and holds advanced certificates in Bioethics and Medical Humanities (Montefiore-Einstein), Health Care Ethics (Fordham), and a Masters of Arts in the Humanities (University of Chicago). Dr. Vukov’s research explores questions at the intersection of ethics, neuroscience, and philosophy of mind, and at the intersection of science and religion.


God and Nature in German Idealism

Thursday, May 12, 2022 at 5:30 | Arts & Letters Room 409

God and Nature in German Idealism

Naomi Fisher is the Director of the Catholic Studies Program and Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University Chicago. She has broad interests in the history of philosophy and the interplay between that history and the history of Christianity. She specializes in the philosophy of Immanuel Kant and his immediate successors, especially Schelling and is currently working on a manuscript on the influence of Platonism in Schelling’s early philosophy. She also has an MS in Physics from UC Davis and has teaching interests in the relationship between science and religion.


The Second Annual Berrigan-McAlister Award: Celebrating Precious Blood Ministry of Reconciliation

Tuesday, May 10, 2022 at 6:30-8:30pm | Student Center 120 and Virtual Live Stream

Berrigan Award

DePaul University presents the second annual Berrigan-McAlister Award in 2022 to Precious Blood Ministry of Reconciliation, an organization that practices “restorative justice” and reconciliation work in Chicago neighborhoods that daily face the challenges of violence and incarceration. The award was created to honor those whose commitment to ‘gospel nonviolence’ resists injustice, transforms conflict, fosters reconciliation, and seeks justice and peace for all. It is named after Daniel Berrigan, S.J., his brother Philip, and Philip’s wife Elizabeth McAlister.


Creatio ad nihilum: Dante’s Alchemic Comedy

Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 5:30-7:00pm | Arts and Letter Room 409

Creatio ad nihilum Dante%27s Alchemic Comedy

Ambrogio Camozzi Pistoja, an Assistant Professor of Italian Studies at Harvard University, conducts research in medieval hermeneutics and on non-physical violence and satire, working at intersections of literature, art and legal history. He is the author of a number of studies on Dante’s Commedia and Convivio, on medieval dream-books, and the medieval reception of the parable theory, and on Auerbach’s figural interpretation. He authored two monographs on the lore of Alexander the Great in medieval and early modern Italy.


Second-hand Experience: Testimony as Cognition

Thursday, February 24, 2022 | Virtual Event

Second hand experience testimony as cognition

Michele Averchi is an Associate Professor at The Catholic University of America in Washington DC. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Milan in 2010 and came to The Catholic University of America in January 2014 after completing a post-doc at the Husserl-Archive in Cologne. His research focuses on Husserlian phenomenology and early phenomenology (in particular Max Scheler and Moritz Geiger) with a strong interest in the phenomenology of the self. His most recent work is on the phenomenology of communication, knowledge-sharing and testimony.


Jesuit Observatories and Jesuit Science

Monday, February 7, 2022 at 5:30-7:00pm | Virtual Event

Jesuit Observatories and Jesuit Science

Br. Guy J. Consolmagno, SJ, Director of the Vatican Observatory and President of the Vatican Observatory Foundation. He has an extensive academic background and has written more than 100 scientific publications alongside numerous books such as “Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial?” and “Finding God in the Universe”.Br. Guy J. Consolmagno, SJ, Director of the Vatican Observatory and President of the Vatican Observatory Foundation. He has an extensive academic background and has written more than 100 scientific publications alongside numerous books such as “Would You Baptize an Extraterrestrial?” and “Finding God in the Universe”.

 


Rome in Chicago

Friday, November 12, 2021 at 12:30-2:30pm | The Art Institute of Chicago

Rome in Chicago

A guided tour of Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Christian artwork at the Art Institute of Chicago. Art historian and medieval art expert, Dr. Sarah Bond presented paintings, sculptures, and litergical objects in the recently opened galleries. Dr. Sarah Bond is an art historian and independent scholar. She received a B.A. from Williams College and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in the History of Art and Architecture, specializing in Medieval Art. Currently, she teaches, lectures, and gives tours aroundthe city, with special expertise in the galleries of the Art Institute and Chicago churches. DePaul students enjoy free admission to the Art Institute due to a partnership between the institutions.


Late Night Study Nights

Study Nights 2021-2022

The Department of Catholic Studies host study nights for students and those interested in CTH courses to meet our professors, learn about course offerings, and study in community.

Mary, Muslims, and the Making of Nostra Aetate 3

Tuesday, June 1, 2021 at 6:30 pm | Virtual Event

Mary, Muslims, and the Making of Nostra Aetate 3

The Vatican II document Nostra aetate calls devotion to Mary a key point of Christian-Muslim encounter. But this statement is not footnoted, so one might wonder about its basis in history and tradition. How did Marian devotion make it into the document’s brief list of connections between Islam and Christianity, along with one God, judgment day, resurrection of the body, and Abraham? This lecture suggests that the Council Fathers’ knowledge of popular devotion to Mary at shared shrines played a role in its inclusion.


A Fame, Peste et Bello, Libera Nos, Domine: Religious Orders, Public Health, and Disease

Thursday, May 20 - Friday, May 21, 2021, 8:45 - 11:45 am | Virtual Event

 International Symposium A Fame, Peste et Bello, Libera Nos, Domine

In the current Covid-19 pandemic context, the symposium will consider how religious orders have played a key role in societies that had to deal with diseases that disrupted their lives or were part of their almost everyday life. Many paths will be explored to promote religious orders' dynamic historiography by emphasizing a comparative and transnational approach to their history. The scope of the symposium will range from the Black Death to the present day.The Vatican II document Nostra aetate calls devotion to Mary a key point of Christian-Muslim


Nonviolent Democratic Insurrection: The People Power Revolution in the Philippines, 1986.

Monday, February 1, 2021 at 6:30 pm | Virtual Event

Nonviolent Democratic Insurrection The People Power Revolution in the Philippines 1986

In 1986, a nonviolent uprising over three days put an end to the right-wing military dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos in the Philippines.  The Catholic Church played a crucial role in the "People Power" revolution--images of nuns blocking tanks spread around the world.  Catholic theologian Agnes Brazal took part in the uprising as a young person.  In this online conversation, she will tell her story of those dramatic days, and discuss the wider implications for the Church's nonviolent defense of democracy in a world where democracy is increasingly threatened.


Zoom Conversation with Professor Zena Hitz

Tuesday, September 22, 2020 at 6:00 pm | Virtual Event

A Zoom Conversation with Zena Hitz

Professor Hitz teaches at St John's College in Annapolis, MD. In her new book Lost in Thought: the Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life she argues that one of the most important things we can do as human beings is cultivated a life that sets aside time for us to think through essential questions about ourselves and our world. We will be talking about her book and she came to connect the intellectual life with loving service. We will also discuss some of her intellectual and spiritual role models.

The Beauty of Faith: Interpreting Religious Art in a Public Museum 

Thursday, May 21, 2020 at 6:00 pm | Virtual Event

The Beauty of Faith Interpreting Religious Art in a Public Museum

Like a well-mannered dinner guest, a museum curator avoids the public discussion of money and religion. Yet, much of the art in museum collections was shaped by faith and made for a religious purpose. Interpretations that focus solely on stylistic aesthetics leave much about the beauty and purpose of the piece unexplained. In this talk, I shall discuss the challenges of interpreting Christian art to a secular audience in a public museum. 


Dignity: A Conversation with Chris Arnade

Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 6:00 pm | Virtual Event

A conversation with Chris Arnade

After abandoning his Wall Street career, Chris Arnade decided to document poverty and addiction in the Bronx. He began interviewing, photographing, and becoming close friends with homeless addicts, and spent hours in drug dens in McDonald's. Then he started driving across America to see how the rest of the country compared. He found the same types of stories everywhere, across lines of race, ethnicity, religion, and geography. As Taskeesha, a woman in the Bronx told Arnade, she wants to be seen shes see herself: " a prostitute, a mother of six, and a child of God." This book is his attempt to help the rest of us truly see, hear, and respect millions of people who've been left behind. 


'The World Which Shall Be Our First': On Beauty and the Human Desire for Transcendence

Monday, March 8, 2020 at 6:00 pm | Arts and Letters Hall, Room 412 

 The World Shall Be Our First

Jennifer Newsome Martin,  Assistant Professor in the Program of Liberal Studies at University of Notre Dame The Vatican II document Nostra aetate calls devotion to Mary a key point of Christian-Muslim encounter. But this statement is not footnoted, so one might wonder about its basis in history and tradition. How did Marian devotion make it into the document’s brief list of connections between Islam and Christianity, along with one God, judgment day, resurrection of the body, and Abraham? This lecture suggests that the Council Fathers’ knowledge of popular devotion to Mary at shared shrines


Sacraments and Friendship 

Tuesday, January 14, 2020 at 5:00 pm | Arts and Letters Hall, Room 414

Sacrament and Friendship

Brandon McGinley is a Catholic writer and speaking based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is a regular contributor to the Scottish Catholic Observer and Angelus News, the magazine of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. Right now, Brandon is working on three books to be released this year: on the virtue of religion and the just society with Dr. Scott Hahn, on renewing the Church in America for Sophia Institute Press, and on the Catholic history and present of his hometown of Pittsburgh.


Our Lady of Chicago: The Surprising Story of our Northern Guadalupe

Tuesday, October 15, 2019 at 5:00 pm | McGowan South, Room 108

Our Lady of Chicago, The Surprising Story of our Northern Guadalupe

Who is Our Lady of Chicago? Which of the city’s countless images of the Virgin Mary best encapsulate the spirit of this city and its land? After surveying various candidates for this title, this lecture will argue for our very own Northern Guadalupe. This particular image encapsulates the forced removal of Chicago’s indigenous inhabitants, a story that all Chicago residents – native or not – too easily forget.

End of Year Breakfast
Thursday, May 30, 2019
SAC 570

End-of-year breakfast celebration on Thursday, May 30, hosted by the Department of Catholic Studies and the Center for World Catholicism & Intercultural Theology!


Edith Stein as Catholic Philosopher
Thursday, May 9, 2019
Arts and Letters Hall 207

Dermot Moran is the inaugural holder of the Joseph Chair in Catholic Philosophy at Boston College.


Dante's Cosmology and the Materiality of Language
Thursday, April 25, 2019
Arts and Letters Hall 207

Ambrogio Camozzi Pistoja is Assistant Professor in Romance Languages and Literatures at Harvard, and a Cambridge Scholar of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He is the author of studies on medieval culture, hermeneutics, and epistemology.

500th Anniversary of the Reformation, Brad Gregory's Talk

Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 6:30PM
Brad Gregory's Talk (video)

Two Vincentians, Turkey's House of Mary, and Nostra Aetate 3

Wednesday, February 28,2018 at 11:30 AM

Catholic Church, Science, and Political Power

Tuesday, May 22, 2018 at 1:30 PM

Catholic Studies 20th Anniversary Celebration

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 5:30PM
Celebratory Remarks (Video)

6th Annual Catholic Studies Breakfast with Sr. Helen Prejean

Tuesday, April 19, 2017 at 8AM
Co-sponsor(s): Office of Mission and Values

Putting Your Whole Self Into It: Dancing, Walking, and Sacrificing from La Tirana to Lough Derg

Monday, February 20, 2017 at 4:30PM
Co-sponsor(s): Irish Studies Program, Department of Latin American and Latino Studies, Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology

An Afternoon With Well-Read Mom

Saturday, February 11, 2017 at 2:00PM
Co-sponsor(s): Well-Read Mom

Mary, Muslims, and Mission in Late Medieval and Early Modern Times

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 12:30PM
Co-sponsor(s): Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, Office of Mission and Values

Comparing Missions: Jesuit and Vincentian Missions in the Italian Countryside (XVII-XIX Century)

Thursday, November 3, 2016 at 12:00PM
Co-sponsor(s): Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology, Office of Mission and Values

The Charism of Dorothy Day and Her Relevance For Today

Thursday, October 27, 2016 at 6:30PM
Co-sponsor(s): Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies

Mother Teresa: A Documentary

Wednesday, October 12, 2016 at 8PM
Co-sponsor(s): Catholic Campus Ministry

Welcome Back Breakfast

Friday, September 23, 2016 at 8:30AM
Co-sponsor(s): Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology

A Punishing Mercy: Divine Love in the Old Testament

Wednesday, May 25, 2016 at 2:45PM

Movies & Mercy: Crash

Thursday, May 19, 2016 at 7PM
Co-sponsor(s): Catholic Campus Ministry

Spiritual Friendship

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at 4PM

Fifth Annual Catholic Studies Breakfast with Sr. Helen Prejean:
The Death Penalty in the Year of Mercy

Monday, April 25, 2016 at 8:30AM

Roundtable on Brother Roger and the Taizé Community

Tuesday, March 1, 2016
Co-sponsor(s): University Ministry

Movies & Mercy: Of Gods And Men

Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 7PM
Co-sponsor(s): Catholic Campus Ministry

Christians in the Middle East: What Future, What Hope?

Thursday, November 19, 2015 at 7PM
Co-sponsor(s): Center for World Catholicism and Intercultural Theology

Saint Junipero Serra: His Life, His Letters

Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 7PM
Co-sponsor(s): Center for World Catholicism and Intecultural Theology, Center for Latino Research


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